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Posts tagged ‘Anyim Pius Anyim’

UNN Troubles: The Pius Anyim Connection By Akobundu Uwabunkonye.


By Akobundu Uwabunkonye

The ‘University of Nigeria’ is not just that by name. Events in the institution lately have turned out to have a truly Nigerian connection. Abuja has been the centre of the struggles for which the UNN has been in the news since the closing days of 2013.

Just a summary, for those who are not familiar with the matter. In early 2013, President Goodluck Jonathan, visitor to the University of Nigeria, constituted the 14th council of the institution, with Dr. Emeka Enejere as chairman. Amidst complaints by many stakeholders about the running of the institution, the council had the university administration, headed by Professor Bartho Okolo, investigated. Few moments after a report of the results of such investigations was submitted to Barrister Nyesom Wike, the Supervising Minster of Education, he pronounced Dr. Enejere suspended as chairman of the UNN council.

Shocked that an investigator was removed for revealing the misdeeds of an investigated, the university workers and Alumni protested, explaining that, besides the fact that due process was not followed, no reason was yet made public for Dr. Enejere’s removal. The university Alumni and workers’ unions made inquiries and later declared that the embattled Vice Chancellor had bribed Wike and the permanent secretary in the education ministry, McJohn Nwaobiala, to rock the boat of the UNN council.

What is more interesting is that, even as of now (if I am not mistaken), Dr. Enejere has not received any formal notice terminating his chairmanship of the UNN council. This might imply that Barr Wike does not want to commit himself in writing, knowing that it was the president’s signature that actuated Dr. Enejere’s chairmanship of the UNN Council. Obviously, a minister’s signature is not weighty enough to nullify that of the president. And this would mean that President Jonathan needed to be effectively kept out of the loop of the UNN troubles for Wike and his cronies’ antics to be sustained. How so?

It has been suggested that Senator Pius Anyi, Dr. Jonathan’s secretary, has a finger in the pie. The Enejere-led UNN Council found that 113 projects were on-going in the institution, all awarded by Prof Okolo. Mobilization fees (in hundreds of millions) made to contractors of the projects were found to be far above what the procurement act stipulates. And that was not all; cases of contract splitting were also established against Prof. Okolo. In one particular case, four contracts were awarded for the building of one complex. That is all the UNN Council said about the matter.

However, a number of independent investigators have mentioned that three of those four contracts were awarded to Syndicated Construction and Commercial Services Limited. The latest of these is the Verbatim magazine dated 17 February 2014. Starlite, a newspaper that circulates mainly in the university town of Nsukka had, on its December 30 publication, mentioned Senator Pius Anyim, Secretary to Dr Jonathan, as the owner of Syndicated Construction and Commercial Services Limited.

This is part of the many claims that a panel of inquiry is needed to investigate in the University of Nigeria. Yes! Dr. Jonathan is a man not given to acting with irascible dispatch. However, his silence amidst all the troubles rocking the UNN, one of his most symbolic constituencies, is really deafening. But that is for starters. My surprise at Dr. Jonathan’s silence over the UNN troubles somewhat ended when I learnt about the alleged Pius Anyim connection to the sleazy mess. Because the president does not effectively follow events in Nigeria himself, it is possible for his secretary to allow him selective knowledge of the country he should be governing.

The president’s reaction (or lack thereof) to the troubles in UNN portrays such sentiment that sometimes compel one to align with those who suggest that Nigeria is being run by other men than Jonathan himself.

Official malfeasance has been said to be Nigeria’s crippler. But sweeping matters of official impunity under the carpet has been the country’s greatest undoing. What with when even education – every society’s last fort – is not spared. We are all paying for it! And more is ahead! Wait for it!

 

The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of SaharaReporters

Stop Sleeping In Public, PDP Chairman Mu’azu Scolds SGF Pius Anyim.


 

Secretary to the Government of the Federation (SGF), Senator Pius Anyim
By Saharareporters, New York

Guests and leaders of the Peoples Democratic Party were stunned on Thursday when the new National Chairman of the party, Alhaji Adamu Mu’azu, specifically urged the Secretary to the Government of the Federation (SGF), Sen. Pius Anyim, to learn not to sleep during public events.

Mu’azu was speaking when leaders of the party from Ebonyi State visited him and the leadership of the party to pay homage and wish him well following his election.

The group was led by the governor, Martin Elechi, who spoke on behalf of the delegation from his state, which included Anyim, Minister of Health Prof. Onyebuchi Chukwu, and some other political office holders from the state.

But while Mu’azu was replying, he looked over at Anyim, who had already dozed off, and immediately confronted the burly SGF.

“Mr. Anyim, I hope you have not started doing what you like doing best,” Mu’azu said, making the motions of a dozing person.  The laughter that followed from the audience woke up the sleeping SGF.

It was gathered that even as Senator, Anyim often fell asleep on the floor of the House, an action that made the late Chuba Okadigbo, at that time the Senate President, to scold him on one occasion.

Witnesses recall that the scolding followed an instance when Anyim, suddenly woke up from his usual sleep and without knowing the topic being discussed, shouted that he wanted to make contribution.

An angry Okadigbo then asked Anyim whether he knew what was being discussed, to which Anyim just smiled, provoking general laughter among the Senators.

South East civil society delegates emerge for National Conference.


 

Emeka Umeagbalasi

Civil society organisations in Nigeria’s South East have emerged among the first to select delegates

for the forthcoming National Conference.

The delegates, who were selected during a meeting of the groups held Friday in Enugu, the political capital of Igboland, are as follows:

1. Comrade Zulu Ofoelue – General Secretary, United Action for Democracy (UAD) & Chairman, Civil Liberties Organization (CLO), Enugu State. [B. Sc Economics, M. Phil (Edu). (From Abia State).

2. Comrade Emeka Umeagbalasi – Chairman, International Society for Civil Liberties and Rule of Law; B.Sc., Criminology and Security Studies; An alumnus of the International Leadership Program of the United States Dept., Class of June 2013; Chairman, CLO Anambra State 2001 to 2007, Vice Chair CLO Southeast Zone and Board Chairman, International Society for Civil Liberties and the Rule of Law since 2008. (From Anambra State).

3. Dr. Jerry Chukwuokolo – Secretary South East Zone, Campaign for Democracy. BA (Hon) MA, PhD (UNN). Formerly Chairman, Campaign for Democracy, Enugu State. (From Enugu State).

4. Eze Eluchie, Esq. President, PADDI Foudnation; LLB, Nigeria; Cert. (Health & Human Rights), Harvard. (From Imo State).

The groups said in a letter to Secretary to the Government of the Federation, Senator Anyim Pius Anyim, dated February 7, 2014 that they nominated the four delegates “given that 24 slots were allotted to Civil Society Organizations in Nigeria, implying 4 delegates for each geo-political zone.”

However, in a communiqué issued at the end of the meeting, the groups “observed the following and called on the Federal Government to act upon them:

“1. That the number of nominees allotted to the Federal and State governments were too high just as the space for delegate nomination to Civil Society Groups was too few. We therefore demand for a suitable adjustment of both.

“2. We insist that Civil Society nominees to the conference who are to represent the South East Zone of Nigeria must be activists resident in and carrying out their activities within the geographical location of South East Nigeria. Any nomination of South East indigenes operating outside the zone would be faulty since such persons mostly lack knowledge of social-development issues in the zone. We therefore believe that only delegates domiciled in the zone are fully conversant with the day-to-day situation of the South East and are therefore most qualified to represent it.

“3. We call on all Nigerians to begin to organize pre-conference deliberations at national, ethnic, state, local and organizational levels in order to articulate an agreed position of the Nigerian people.”
Source News Express

Source: Radio Biafra.

National Conference just before another jamboree.


national-conference-001

President Goodluck Jonathan has released the modalities for the convocation of a National Conference with limited powers.

Expectedly, criticisms have been trailing the modalities. The seriousness of the Federal Government has been questioned by many stakeholders. The consensus of opinion is that, for another three months or more, delegates will participate in a government-sponsored jamboree in Abuja, the Federal Capital Territory (FCT). Since the premise for the national dialogue is not the ethnic nationalities, many have also argued that the exercise is an imposition.

However, pro-Jonathan forces have a contrary view. They believe that the conference will chart a new course for the country. Hailing the President for acceding to the popular request for a national debate, they also said that the conference will lay a better constitutional future.

When the President unfolded his plan for the conference on October 1, last year, many stakeholders queried his real intention. There were speculations that the idea was sold the option to the embattled leader to douse the mounting national tension. But, the sudden change of heart by the Commander-in-Chief still came as a surprise. In the past, Dr. Jonathan had objected to it, saying that a democratic government was in place. The proposal polarised the polity. A section said that the Federal Government was trying to divert attention from its gross failure to restore hope to the beleaguered country. In particular, the advocates of a Sovereign National Conference (SNC) were not amused. In their view, the proposal fell below expectation.

Public enthusiasm has been waning since the Presidential Advisory Committee headed by Senator Femi Okurounmu submitted its report to the President. It was a divided committee. A minority report surfaced. It was written by a member of the committee, Chief Solomon Asemota (SAN). The bone of contention was the method proposed for the ratification of the conference report. While the majority report hammered on parliamentary ratification, the minority report emphasised the import of ratification by a referendum. The majority report on the mode of ratification reflected the President’s view. Last year, Dr. Jonathan told the nation that the report will be sent to the National Assembly for ratification. The implication is that the decisions reached at the conference may or may not be approved by the National Assembly.

The fear expressed by critics were confirmed last week when the Secretary to the Federal Government, Senator Pius Ayim, released the guidelines. 492 delegates are expected at the talk show. They are to be drawn from the strata of the society: government, traditional institution, political parties, judiciary, and civil societies. They are to be nominated by local, state and federal governments. Thus, it is “guided conference”.

The ethnic nationalities may not command a strong voice there. Observers have argued that nominees may not have the mind of their own. Since he who plays the piper dictates the tune, the presidential nominees will be his eye and ear at the conference. The delegates may therefore, be manipulated by the government to achieved a pre-determined goal.

The official name of the dialogue is The National Conference. This is antithetical to a Sovereign National Conference. There is a no-go area. The Federal Government is sensitive to the warning by a foreign body that the country may disintegrate next year. Therefore, it stated that the unity of Nigeria is non-negotiable. The time frame is also suspect. The government has proposed three months. But, it is evident that the conference will coincide with preparations for the 2015 general elections.

The timeframe for the nomination of delegates is between now and February 20. Wide consultations may not herald the nominations. In outlook, the proposed conference is elitist. The President may have also played a fast game. He is not indifferent to the position of the main opposition party, the All Progressives Congress (APC), on the vexed issue. Therefore, if the 17 APC governors refuse to nominate delegates, Dr. Jonathan, an Ijaw from the Southsouth, will nominate delegates on their behalf. These delegates may come from the ruling Peoples’ Democratic Party (PDP). Critics will describe their assignments as “jobs for the boys”.

The delegates are expected to receive remuneration. But, funding for the conference is another hurdle. Although the conference is expected to commence proceedings this month, there is no assurance that the budget would have been passed before next month.

The script was carefully written at Aso Villa, the seat of government. But, The President needed an ally to sell the dummy. He found one in Senate President David Mark, who was saddled with flying the cart. The retired General, who had frowned at the agitation for the conference in the past, based on his belief in the legitimacy of the National Assembly as the anchor of popular rule, suddenly retraced his steps. Thus, many believed that the conference propaganda was designed to gage the public mood.

Historically, at critical points in national history, past governments have resorted to camouflage national debate, talk or dialogue to douse the tension. Indeed, when the dreadful dictator, the late Gen. Sani Abacha, set up a constitutional conference in 1994, the uprising in the Niger Delta stopped for one year. The Abacha conference was made up of 396 delegates. The late head of State nominated 96 members. Although the report of the 1994/95 conference did not see the light of the day, the delegates succeeded in dividing Nigeria into six geo-political zones. The six geo-political regions are not backed by law, but the structure is respected by the political class. Also, when former President Olusegun Obasanjo inaugurated the Abuja Reforms Conference, expectations were high that it would usher in a new dawn. The conference collapsed on the altar of the third term agenda. Of 400 delegates, Obasanjo nominated 50 delegates. Many delegates, who have reflected on the report, have called for the implementation of the report. Former Lagos State Governor Bola Tinubu, who also nominated delegates, has backed the call for the retrieval of the report from the dustbin. He said since resolutions have been passed on many of the issues that the delegates are going to debate in Abuja, the Federal Government should have the courage to implement the 2005 report.

Shortly after he assumed the reins, the first military Head of State, the late Gen. Thomas Auguyi-Ironsi, set up an ad hoc constitutional committee to debate the contentious issues tearing apart the country. The committee was dead on arrival. At the inception of the military rule, soldiers in power lacked the political skills to handle those sensitive issues and problems which the military intervention had compounded. When the Muritala/Obasanjo set up the Constitutional Drafting Committee and Constituent Assembly, the transition to civil rule programme of the regime received a popular acclaim. Even, when the former President Ibrahim Babangida set up the Constituent Assembly in 1989, it calmed down the nerves. But, the report also did not see the light of the day.

President Jonathan’s first step at implementing the proposal was confusing. He named an advocate of a Sovereign National Conference (SNC), Dr. Okurounmu, as the Chairman of the Presidential Advisory Committee to prepare the ground for the talk. But, the committee was on tour of the six geo-political regions to collate views on modalities, the President announced that the National Assembly will debate the conference report. The statement irked many people. But, the members of the committee became deviated from their terms of reference when they were defending the President. When the team led by Okurounmu visited Benin, the capital of Edo State, for consultation with the Southsouth stakeholders, a committee member, Col. Tony Nyiam, took on Governor Adams Oshiomhole. Thus, the committee was censoring public opinion on the conference.

During the debate on the proposed conference, members of the National Assembly were not aloof. In the beginning, they loathed the idea of conference, pointing out that the nation should not waste time on another Constituent Assembly that will be saddled with the business of constitution making at a time the National Assembly is also reviewing the constitution. But, when reality dawned on them that the conference would be inevitable, they indicated a deeper interest. Deputy Senate President Ike Ekweremadu said in Lagos that it will not be a bad idea, if the legislators are also delegates. He explained that federal lawmakers are also stakeholders. However, the agitation for the inclusion of the legislators was doused when the President announced that the report will be ratified by the National Assembly.

According rights activists and leaders of the ethnic nationalities, a conference, on its merit, is not a bad idea. The obstacle to its success in the past was the lack of sincerity by the government. Since it is not going to be a SNC, many rights activists have submitted that the scope of the national dialogue will be essentially limited. There are some puzzles: If a constitution is expected to be fashioned out by the conference, should there be no-go areas? Can a national conference produce a truly peoples’ constitution? Should the government insist that the unity of Nigeria is non-negotiable in a country that has not become a nation, 100 years after the amalgamation? How will the suitability and competence of delegates be determined? If they are nominated or appointed by the government and influential elite as it is being proposed by the Federal Government, will their nominations meet the criteria for representativeness and legitimacy? How popular are the delegates at the grassroots? Would they have the mandate of the people who are emotionally attached to the ethnic nationalities? Now that the nomination is based partially on the ethnic nationalities, states, local governments or constituencies, what will be the ratio of representation? Will the proposed single term of six or seven years resurface at the conference for debate?

There are other questions: since delegates be appointed by the governors, what is the criteria? What will be the terms of reference? How will they emerge across the states? Will the conference resolutions be subjected to referendum? If it is not subjected to a referendum, how will the report or resolutions be validated? If it is not validated by a referendum, will it be legitimate? Will recommendations be accepted by the government, if delegates oppose the proposed ratification by the National Assembly? Will the report be thrown into the dustbin as usual? The Federal Government has said that resolutions on contentious issues would be taken, based on the approval of 75 percent of delegates. 75 percent of 492 is 369 delegates. How about resolutions that mainly touch on the lives of the minority tribes, who may not be adequately represented? Will the majority not trample on the wish of the minority?

Since the eighties, the agitation for a Sovereign National Conference had gained prominence. It was first articulated by the legal luminary, the late Chief Alao Aka-Bashorun. The deceased human rights lawyer said that it was possible to hold the conference in Nigeria. He urged the government to tap from the experience of the Soviet Union and the Republic of Benin, which resolved some of its problems by convoking conferences. Throughout the military rule, Aka-Bashorun was harassed for his principled position on the national question and agitation for a Sovereign National Conference.

Also, in the nineties, the former Oyo State governor, Chief Bola Ige, who summed up the arguments for the national conference, raised two questions: “Do we want to remain as one country? If the answer is yes, under what conditions?”. The implication is that a debate is necessary to determine the basis for peaceful co-existence and harmony. Ige said that many national problems could be resolve by debate, instead of resorting to the barrels of gun.

Following the annulment of the historic June 12, 1993 presidential election won by the late Chief Moshood Abiola, there was disillusionment. The cancellation disputed the basis for peaceful co-existence among the competing tribes. The advocates of the SNC expanded the national question. Discussion on the resolution of the identity, integration, participation and distribution crises came to the front burner. Stakeholders came to the conclusion that Nigeria was hanging on a flawed or defective federal system. The unitary system foisted on the polity by the military had created strains. But the interlopers opposed the struggle for a new order with brute force.

Up to now, these questions remained unsolved: Is state or community police not desirable in a big, diverse, heterogeneous country characterised by multiplicity of traditions, customs, and languages? Should the governors, who are the chief security officers of their states, continue to obtain permission from the distant Inspector-General of Police to maintain law and order? Should an Igbo or Yoruba, who was born and bred in the North be denied political and economic rights, owing to the tension between indigeneship and residency? Should a Fulani/Hausa, who had lived in the South for 30 years be edged out of the participatory political process? It remains to be seen if these questions will be answered by Jonathan’s National Conference, which has limitations. Does the President needs a conference to fight the infrastructure battle, tar the roads and fund education and public hospitals efficiently? Does the President needs a conference to build refineries, fight corruption and resolve the crises that have engulfed his party? Does he need a conference to guarantee power supply?

Posted by: EMMANUEL OLADESU

Source: Radio Biafra

Sunday Musings: On this Matter of the National Conference By Mobolaji E. Aluko.


By Mobolaji E. Aluko, PhD

My People : The Federal Government recently announced the modalities for the much-awaited National Conference, following the submission of the report of the Okunrounmu-led  Presidential Advisory Committee on National Dialogue.

On this issue of a National Conference, despite misgivings from various quarters, I am in general support provided:

– the process is as inclusive as possible; this has implication for length of time allowed for it as well as the character, number and process of choice of the delegates  [I recommend below six months rather than three months now announced by the FGN.]

– the total number of delegates in the Final Conference should not be unnecessarily wieldy. [Well, my recommendation below reduces the total number from 492 to anywhere between 426 and 479 – not much a reduction, but now with significant re-distribution among the various categories of delegates.]

– there is greater clarity in how and who does the selection and/or election of delegates

– while not an Ethnic Nationalities Conference, sufficient weight to their views must be built into the National Conference [I recommend below that the Ethnic Nationalities representation should be one-quarter to one-third of the total delegates.  Their number should therefore be increased from 90 to 107 (for one-quarter representation) or 160 (for one-third representation)]

– government choice of delegates should be as few as possible; this actually builds in more legitimacy, not less. [Instead of 181 (or 37% of total delegates), I recommend below  only 20 (19 Elder statesmen and the Chairman of the Conference) chosen by Government (President or Governors or FGN) – that is about 5%.]

– we increase of Diaspora representation from 8 to 12 (splitting America into USA (2 delegates), Canada (1) and South America (1), and Asia into Near Asia (2 delegates) and Far Asia (2 delegates), with Europe and Africa having 2 delegates each.]

– the cost of the National Conference is minimal [N4.7 million per person per month appears too high.  A breakdown of how this N7 billion total cost estimate was arrived at would be helpful.]  However, what is worth doing is worth doing well, and if it costs high, so be it.

– it ends up in a new Popular Constitution, complete with a Referendum,  not tinkering with the current one;

– the new Constitution forms the basis of the 2015 Presidential elections

Other recommendations will be found in tabular form below.

The recently-announced Modalities for the Conference don’t all expressly allow the above – but one hopes that some or all of my recommendations below will be considered before the National Conference begins.

And there you have it.  Comments are welcome.

 

Bolaji Aluko

-The National Conference

S/N

Item

Decision of FGN

Aluko Commentary

1

Official name

The National Conference

Missing is the adjective “Sovereign”, but I can let that go

2

Venue

Abuja

Final one may be Abuja, but there should be many mini-conferences first, AT least in the capitals of each of the states to ensure greater inclusivity

3

Duration

Three months

Too short: six months are recommended

4

Discussion Topics

Almost all or any subject matter….except….

Should be ANY subject at all

5

No-Go Area

Indivisibility and indissolubility of Nigeria as a nation, therefore the unity of Nigeria is non-negotiable;

This “No Go” area not necessary.  Allow those who want division and dissolution to be shouted down – or hailed – at the NC, then we shall see.  Be assured that Nigeria is not going dissolved anywhere…..so why fret?

6

Conference management

Secretariat to manage, administer and run its affairs

Okay

7

Decision Making

By consensus; but where it is not achievable, it shall be by 75% majority

Okay

8

Purpose of National Conference

To advise the government on the legal framework, legal procedures and options for integrating the decisions and outcomes of the national conference into the Constitution and laws of the country

Just to advise integration? No – it should be to OUTLINE a new Constitution entirely, not tinker with the old one.  NBA (Body of SANs) should be drafted to technocratically DRAFT the Constitution before a Popular Referendum, which should be given to National Assembly/President for formal assent only. The Constitution should be enacted before and be the basis for the 2015 Presidential elections, otherwise it should be POSTPONED until after then, otherwise NC might be a wasted effort

9

Conference Leadership

A Chairperson and a Deputy Chairperson of unimpeachable integrity

Okay

10

Delegate Nomination Period

Begin Thursday January 30 and end Thursday, February 20, 2014

Has already presumably begun, but  the ability of “getting together” of many of the named Stakeholder groups in order to nominate their delegates is very  nebulous

11

Method of Nomination

List of nominees shall be submitted either online to www.osgf.gov.ng or in hard copy to the Office of the Permanent Secretary (Special Duties Office), Office of the Secretary to the Government of the Federation, Federal Secretariat Complex, Phase I, 3rd Floor, Central Business District, Abuja.

Okay, but nothing is on www.osgf.gov.ng is available yet to do this nomination there. At least, I visited to nominate one or two persons (don’t ask me who.)

12

Period of NC

March to May 2014

Too short – March to August 2014  minimum

13

Approximate Cost

N7.00 billion

Ehn – N14.2 million per person, N4.7 million per person per month for three months? Let’s see the breakdown in terms of cost of venue, materials, accommodation, food, general conference services,  transportation, honorarium  – and legal “incidentals”.

Modalities for the nomination of the delegates

S/N

Stakeholders

FGN Number

Of Delegates

FGN Specifications

Nominator

(according to FGN)

Aluko Commentary

Recommended number

1

Elder Statesmen

37

One per state and the FCT

President

Too many – 3 per geo-zone + FCT are enough

19

2

Retired Military and Security Personnel

18

One delegate per geopolitical zone each from the Military, Police, State Security and National Intelligence Agency

Stakeholders

Too many – one per geo-zone, mixed such that 2 each from the services

6

3

Traditional Rulers

13

Two per geo-political zone and one from the FCT

Stakeholders

Okay – but just specify (chosen from one of the Chairmen of the Council of Chiefs by them)

13

4

Retired Civil Servants

6

One per geo-zone

Stakeholders

Why?  Some of the delegates will fulfill this anyway.

0

5

Labour

24

Nigeria Labour Congress, NLC, and Trade Union Congress, TUC, to reflect Geo-political and gender balance

Stakeholders

Too many

12

6

The Organised Private Sector

8

NECA, MAN, NACCIMA, NESG, two delegates each

Stakeholders

Too many – one each enough

4

7

Nigeria Youth Organisations

12

National Youth Council of Nigeria and National Association of Nigerians Students, NANS, shall each nominate six delegates, one from each geo-political zone,

Stakeholders

Okay

12

8

Outstanding Youths and Role Models

6

One from each geo-political zone for “other”

Federal Government

Why? Government should as much as possible remove any tendency to dilute Stakeholder choice influence

0

9

Women Groups

12

National Council Of Women Society, NCWS, two per geo- political zone

Stakeholders

Okay

12

10

Market Women Association

6

One per geo-political zone.

Stakeholders

Okay

6

11

Women Organizations

6

International Federation of Women Lawyers, FIDA;  Nigerian Association of Women Journalists, NAWOJ; and Women in Management and Business, WINBIZ, shall each nominate two Delegates;

Stakeholders

Okay

6

12

Political Parties in National Assembly

10

Parties that have representation in the National Assembly, including the Peoples Democratic Party, PDP, All Progressives Congress, APC,  All Progressives Grand Alliance, APGA, Accord Party, Labour Party, LP, two delegates each

Stakeholders

Too few…all parties that have ANY representation at all in ANY state legislature. In fact, why not all INEC-registered parties – all 25 of them?

25

13

Religious Leaders

12

Christian and Muslim Leaders

Stakeholders

Okay

12

14

Civil Society Organisations

24

Across board

Stakeholders

Not necessary – are these all other named associations NOT “Civil Society?”

0

15

Nigerians in Diaspora

8

Europe, America, Africa, Asia, and Middle East,  two delegates per location

Stakeholders

Not Enough – America should be broken into three (2 representing USA, 1 representing Canada and 1 representing South America), as well as Asia (2 representing Far Asia and 2 Representing Near Asia)

12

16

People Living with Disabilities

6

One per geo-political zone

Stakeholder

Okay

6

17

Media

8

Newspapers Proprietors Association of Nigeria, Nigeria Guild of Editors, Nigeria Union of Journalists and the Broadcasting Organisation of Nigeria shall nominate 2 delegates each;

Stakeholders

Okay

8

18

Socio Political/ Cultural and Ethnic Nationality Groups

90

15 delegates each, per geo-political zone to reflect religious and ethnic diversities;

Stakeholders

Not enough at all….this number should be near to or equal to the quorum of Conference membership (assumed to be one-third)

107 – for one-quarter representation;

 

160 – for one-third representation

 

19

Professional Bodies

13

NBA, NSE, CIB, NMA, NIM, NIA, ICAN, ANAN, NIPR, AAPN, NIESV, Nigerian Environment Society and  Nigeria Economic Society

Stakeholders

Okay

13

20

National Academies

5

The Academy of Science, Academy of Engineering, Academy of Education, Academy of Letters and the Academy of Social Sciences shall each nominate 1 delegate;

Stakeholders

Okay..but no ASUU?

5

21

Former Judiciary Personnel

6

From the Judiciary not currently serving on the bench

President

Okay…but why does the President have to be the one to choose them?  NJC nko?

6

22

Former Political Office Holders

24

Former governors, Senators Forum, House of Reps Forum and the Association of Former Speakers shall each nominate one delegate per geo-political zone

Stakeholders

Okay….but how will they choose themselves?

24

23

FG

Delegates

20

At least six will be women

Federal Government

Why? A nebulous group

0

24

State Governments

Delegates

109

3 delegates each based on Senatorial District at least, while the FCT shall nominate 1 delegate, one of whom shall be a woman. The nomination shall be done by the state governors and where the state fails to nominate, the President shall nominate the required number from the state

State Governor and/or President

The number is okay, but choice by state governors defeats popular representation.  This is where LIMITED election or selection by the populace should be instituted

109

25

Former LG Chairmen

6

One from each from the six geo- political zones;

ALGON

Okay

6

26

Conference Leaders

3

Chairman, Deputy Chairman and Secretary, observing geo-political spread

President

Number okay, but President should just choose Chairman, and let the Conference choose the other two

3

 

TOTAL

492

 

 

 

426 or 479

 

The National Conference: How we got here

 

S/N

Date

Event

1

Independence Day broadcast October 1, 2013

President Goodluck Jonathan announces set up a Presidential Advisory Committee on National Dialogue (PACND)

Composition: Senator Dr. Femi Okurounmu-Chairman; Dr. Akilu Sani Indabawa -Secretary, Senator Khairat Abdulrazaq-Gwadabe, Senator Timothy Adudu; Professor Olufunke Adeboye; Professor George A. Obiozor, Professor Ben Nwabueze, SAN, NNOM (declined, later replaced by Prof. Anya Anya),  Dr. Abubakar Siddique Mohammed; Malam Bukhari Bello, MFR, mni; Mr. Tony I. Uranta,  Col. Tony Nyiam (Rtd) (later replaced by Mr. Solomon Asemota (SAN)); Alhaji Dauda Birmah, OFR and Dr. Mrs. Mairo Ahmed Amshi, MFR.

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October 7, 2013

Date of Inauguration of PACND

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December 18, 2013

Submission of Report of PACND

 

http://www.osgf.gov.ng/content?id=135

STATEMENT BY ANYIM PIUS ANYIM, GCON, SECRETARY TO THE GOVERNMENT OF THE FEDERATION, ON THE OCASSION OF THE RELEASE OF THE MODALITIES FOR THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE TO THE MEDIA ON 3OTH JANUARY, 2014; ABUJA

Gentlemen of the Press,

It is my pleasure to welcome you all to this Press Conference. The purpose is to share with you, the highlights of the decisions of the Federal Government on the Report of the Presidential Advisory Committee on National Dialogue. I am indeed pleased and grateful that I am joined here today by the Chairman of the Advisory Committee, Senator Femi Okunronmu and the Secretary, Dr. Akilu Indabawa. I will make a brief statement and thereafter, all of us will be available to respond to your questions.

2.      You will recall that the President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Goodluck Ebele Jonathan,GCFR, during his Independence Day National Broadcast, on 1st October, 2013 set up a 13-Member Presidential Advisory Committee on National Dialogue under Senator Femi Okurounmu. The Committee which was inaugurated on 7th October 2013 was mandated to advise Government on the framework for a national dialogue by consulting widely with Nigerians. The Committee was given seven (7) terms of reference and was asked to submit its report in six (6) weeks.   The Committee met that target and in many respects, it exceeded all expectations.  At this juncture, let me once again, on behalf of the President, thank the Chairman and members of the Committee for their dedication, tenacity and courage in handling the assignment.

3.      The Federal Government is satisfied that the Committee has diligently discharged its task to the nation and posterity.  This is moreso, especially as one recalls the foundational principles of their assignment as espoused by President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan at the inauguration of the Committee. On that occasion, Mr. President emphasized that, “this is a National Project, a sincere and fundamental undertaking, aimed at realistically examining and genuinely resolving, long-standing impediments to our cohesion and harmonious development as a truly United Nation”.

4.      You will also recall that the President further stressed that, “sitting down to talk is one right step in calming down tensions and channeling our grievances, misgivings and suggestions into more positive use for the good of our country”. The President stated as well that in any case, Nigerians are already talking about their national challenges through the print and electronic media. He observed that, “the only gap is that while these talks are sometimes weighty, they often lack direction”. Therefore, one of the objectives for setting up the Committee was to lend weight and direction to the National Dialogue. You may also recall that Mr. President has also allayed “the fears of those who think the National Dialogue will call the integrity of Nigeria into question”, and added that, “this National Dialogue will strengthen our union and address issues that are often on the front burner, but too frequently ignored”.

5.      I wish to thank all Nigerians for their enthusiastic response to the opportunity to structure a national dialogue in the manner offered by the President. We are grateful for the massive support and encouragement that the broad strata and all sections of our nation gave to the Advisory Committee in all parts of the country they visited.  Also, let me in particular, extend our deep appreciation to members of the press. All of you contributed in no small way to sustain free and robust debate on every platform, to promote the ideals of the national dialogue.

6.      I am pleased to inform you that Government gave the most expeditious consideration to the Report of the Advisory Committee. In doing so, we sought explanations and guidance from the members of the Committee as at when necessary. We were also deeply encouraged by the calls by Nigerians from all works of life for us to proceed with the Report of the Committee with uttermost urgency, so that the nation can be through with the Dialogue well ahead of the approaching political season.

7.      I now have the privilege to announce that the Government, after long and mature deliberations on the Committees’ Report, accepts the following recommendations for immediate implementation:

(a)          The official name of the conversation/conference shall be “The National Conference”;

(b)                   The National Conference shall hold in the Federal                              Capital Territory, Abuja;

(c)          The National Conference shall tentatively last for 3 months and shall discuss any subject matter, except the indivisibility and indissolubility of Nigeria as a nation, therefore the unity of Nigeria is non-negotiable;

(d)          A Conference Management Secretariat shall be established to manage, administer and run the affairs of the Conference;

(e)          Decisions at the National Conference shall be by consensus; but where it is not achievable; it shall be by 75% majority;

(f)           The National Conference shall advise the Government on the legal framework, legal procedures and options for integrating the decisions and outcomes of the national conference into the Constitution and laws of the country; and

(g)          The National Conference shall have a Chairperson and a Deputy Chairperson of unimpeachable integrity.

8.      Furthermore, the Federal Government has since approved the next steps necessary towards actualizing the National Conference as follows:

(i)      30th January,   2014     –        Formal release of the modalities for the National Conference;

(ii)      30th January, 2014       –        20th February, 2014                                  Nomination of Delegates;

(iii)     Inauguration of the Conference will follow soon after the delegate list is concluded.

 

9.      Pursuant to the foregoing, the modalities for the nomination of delegates to the Conference are as provided in the attached table.

 

10.    The list of nominees shall be submitted either online to www.osgf.gov.ng or in hard copy to the Office of the Permanent Secretary (Special Duties Office), Office of the Secretary to the Government of the Federation, Federal Secretariat Complex, Phase I, 3rd Floor, Central Business District, Abuja.  Formal inauguration of the Conference shall follow as soon as the nominations are received and collated.

 

11.    Thank you.

 

ANYIM PIUS ANYIM, GCON

Secretary to the Government of the Federation

Update On The National Conference Modalities.


 

Jonathan the Igbo Man

After a few weeks of suspense, federal government on Thursday unveiled modalities for the proposed national conference. A total of 492 delegates are billed to participate in the conference that will last three months.Out of the 492, President Goodluck Jonathan is to nominate 77 across specified strata of the society while state governors are to collectively nominate 109 delegates.Following the modalities released by the secretary to the government of the federation, Anyim Pius Anyim, the socio-political group of the north, Arewa Consultative Forum(ACF), and its counterpart in the south-west, the Afenifere, both gave their stand on the national conference and it’s modalities.ACF’s spokesman, Anthony Sani, in a terse statement said he had nothing to add or subtract from it.“I have just read the statement by the federal government on the national conference, and pleased to say that I have nothing to add or subtract. I therefore pray the nominees will be our first 11 endowed with public intelligence and patriotic courage,” Sani said.On its part, the Yoruba socio-political body, Afenifere, acknowledged the template for the conference as the first of its kind to recognize the ethnic nationalities in the country.Afenifere’s spokesman Yinka Odumakin, who made the position of the group known, however, cautioned that the representations to the conference could be better handled by stakeholders.“Again, Afenifere finds it commendable that stakeholders will nominate their delegates, and not the government interfering in the process of nomination by interest groups; this is a welcome development.”But the APC said the proposed conference is just to keep Nigerians busy so people wont ask questions about the rot in the country as well as question the scandalous 2014 budget.
Interim national publicity secretary of the APC Lai Mohammed said:
“What is there that would make us change our position? Has anything happened that could make us change our position? We stand by

our position. It is a deceit, fraud and a diversionary tactic to cover up the failure of the PDP.”
Biafragalaxy.com.

Source: Radio Biafra.

National Conference Nigeria’s unity, no-go area.


 

national-conference-001

*All 492 delegates to be nominated *75% majority to approve decisions *Conference may begin late February

THE Federal Government, yesterday, declared that the indivisibility and indissolubility of Nigeria would be the only no-go area for the planned National Conference which may be convened before the end of February.

This was disclosed by Secretary to the Government of the Federation, Senator Anyim Pius Anyim, while briefing newsmen in Abuja on the Federal Government’s endorsement of the recommendations of the Presidential Advisory Committee on National Dialogue which submitted its report few weeks ago.

During the briefing, Anyim was flanked by Chairman and Secretary of the Presidential Committee on National Dialogue, Senator Femi Okurounmu and Dr. Akilu Indabawa, respectively.

 

He also said the Federal Government had provided for the confab in the 2014 Appropriation Bill currently before the National Assembly.

Anyim further disclosed that a total of 492 delegates would be expected to attend the conference which is scheduled to take place in Abuja after the conclusion of nomination of delegates slated for February 20.

The SGF said that the confab which is scheduled to last for three months shall have a Chairperson and a Deputy Chairperson of “unimpeachable integrity.” He added that the exercise must be concluded before the commencement of political activities leading up to next year’s general elections.

According to Anyim: “The official name of the conversation/conference shall be “The National Conference”.
He stated that decisions at the National Conference shall be by consensus, but where it is not achievable, it shall be by 75 per cent majority.

He further stated that the National Conference shall advise the Government on the legal framework, legal procedures and options for integrating the decisions and outcomes of the confab into the Constitution and laws of the country.

Anyim disclosed that a Conference Management Secretariat shall be established to manage, administer and run the affairs of the Conference.

He also stated that nomination of delegates which shall begin immediately must be completed by all stakeholders before a date for the commencement of the confab could be fixed.
List of nominees
According to him: “The list of nominees shall be submitted either online to http://www.osgf.gov.ng or in hard copy to the Office of the Permanent Secretary (Special Duties Office), Office of the Secretary to the Government of the Federation, Federal Secretariat Complex, Phase I, 3rd Floor, Central Business District, Abuja.”

The SGF also released a list indicating the details of the proposed composition of the conference which showed that the Federal Government would nominate a minimum of 73 delegates.

A break down of this figure shows that the President shall appoint the Chairman, Deputy Chairman and Secretary of the confab. He shall also nominate 37 elder statesmen representing the 36 states of the federation and the FCT. The document further indicates that the Federal Government shall directly nominate 20 delegates, of which six shall be women.

The confab shall also have six retired judiciary nominees which would be appointed by the President. Another six nominees who shall represent outstanding youths in the country shall be appointed by the Federal Government to represent the nation’s six geo-political zones.

The list further shows that state governments and the Federal Capital Territory, FCT, would nominate a total of 109 delegates to represent the nation’s Senatorial Districts. Each state in the federation would be expected to nominate three delegates while the FCT would be represented by one delegate.

The list provides that ethnic nationalities in the country, alongside socio-political and cultural groups will produce a total of 90 delegates which shall comprised 15 per geo-political zone. Nominations for delegates in this category must reflect the ethnic and religious diversity of the various geo-political zones.

The comprehensive list
The comprehensive list is as follows: Retired military and security personnel:
Military – six delegates: one from each geo-political zone; Police- six delegates, one from each zone; State Security Service and Nigerian Intelligence Agency NIA, six, one from each zone.

A total of 13 traditional rulers in all shall be delegates at the confab. Every zone shall send two traditional rulers, while one would come from FCT. Retired civil servants would nominate six delegates from the six zones.

The Nigeria Labour Movement shall be represented by a total of 24 delegates which shall comprise 12 each from the Nigeria Labour Congress, NLC, and the Trade Unions Congress, TUC.

The Organised Private Sector would be represented by eight delegates who are to be nominated by NECA, MAN, NACCIMA and NESG. Each of them shall nominate two delegates.

Nigerian youths shall also be represented by 18 delegates at the confab: Six of them shall come from the six zones; six from NANS representing the six zones while another six ” outstanding youths and role models” would represent the six zones.

Women groups in the country would be represented by a total of 24 delegates. Among the groups that would nominate delegates are NCWS-12; Market Women associations- six, reflecting the six zones. Other women groups that would send two delegates each are NAWOJ, FIDA and WINBIZ.

Political parties in the country which have members in the National Assembly would also be represented by two delegates each; they include PDP, APC, Labour Party, APGA and Accord Party.

The two major religions in the country that is Christianity and Islam are to be represented by six delegates each, while civil society groups are to be represented by 24 delegates who are expected to reflect the nation’s federal character.

Nigerians in diaspora would not be left out as eight of them would also participate in the confab as delegates. The eight delegates are to represent Nigerians in the Americas-two, Europe-two, Asia and the Middle-East, two and Africa-two.

People living with disabilities would nominate six delegates to the confab, one from each zone.
The media would also be represented by NPAN, NUJ, NGE and BON which were allotted two slots each.
Professional bodies in the country would also send 13 delegates. They include NBA, NSE and CIB. Others include NMA, NIM, NIA, ICAN, ANAN, NIPR, AAPN, NIESV and Nigeria Environmental Society. They are all expected to send one delegate each.

The various academies in the country would send a total of five delegates. They include: Academies of Science, Engineering and Education. Others are academies of letters and social sciences. Each of them would send one delegate.

Former political office holders would also be accommodated at the confab. Former governors in the country would send six delegates- from the six zones. This also applies to former Senators, former members of the House of Representatives and Association of former Speakers. Former chairmen of local government areas would also send six delegates reflecting the six zones. They would be nominated by ALGON.

It would be recalled that President Goodluck Jonathan had during his Independence Day broadcast last October, informed Nigerians that he had set up a Presidential Advisory Committee on National Dialogue with the following composition: Senator Dr. Femi Okurounmu-Chairman; Dr. Akilu Sani Indabawa -Secretary and

Senator Khairat Abdulrazaq-Gwadabe as member.
Others included: Senator Timothy Adudu; Professor Olufunke Adeboye; Professor George A. Obiozor and Professor Ben Nwabueze, SAN, NNOM.

Also appointed into the committee were Dr. Abubakar Siddique Mohammed; Malam Bukhari Bello, MFR, mni; Mr. Tony I. Uranta; Col. Tony Nyiam (Rtd); Alhaji Dauda Birmah, OFR and Dr. Mrs. Mairo Ahmed Amshi, MFR.

In his remarks while inaugurating the Committee on October 7, 2013, President Jonathan had said it comprised of ‘Nigerians with wide experiences from various disciplines. He also described the formation of the Committee as ‘a child of necessity.’ He stated that the foundational principle that drove the composition of the Committee was to work towards convening a national conversation.

By Okey Ndiribe

Source: Radio Biafra.

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