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Posts tagged ‘Biometrics’

Biometric Technology Will Make Huge Advances In 2014.


RELATED STORY: The Mark of the Beast and the Implantable RFID Chip

The onslaught of technological coolness is dazzling, mind-boggling even. Everywhere you look there are apps and wearable devices that sync up to the cloud, and everyone is adopting them like crazy. George Orwell, in all his 1984 glory, could not have envisioned the One World Government curve ball that this would engender.

We no longer have to worry about the government creating a file on us, we are making our own with every post, pic and #hashtag we launch out into the cybersphere. And when the Mark of the Beast arrives, people will jump to adopt that one as well.

Good thing that we won’t be here for that!

CS Monitor: Apple’s new iPhone 5S comes with the company’s first fingerprint scanner. A simple stamp of your thumb can now unlock the phone or confirm online purchases. No passwords are required.

While Apple fans have long awaited this big update, so has another group: the biometrics industry. Sensor companies have been wishing for a major player to swoop in, show how far the technology has advanced, and persuade shoppers that biometrics can be cool.

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With each passing day, we are being monitored, tagged and branded like cattle in the stockyard.

“Many think that the iPhone 5S is a tipping point for consumers,” says Adam Vrankulj, editor of the industry news outlet Biometric Update. After Apple purchased fingerprint-sensor company AuthenTec for $350 million in 2012, the stock price of several similar firms more than doubled.

Fingerprint sensors have come a long way since 2002, when researchers found a way to trick high-end scanners with fake gelatin fingers. Today’s technology not only reads the tiny ridge patterns, but some can also look at blood flow and vein patterns underneath the skin.

Plus, we now know that fingerprints and irises are not people’s only unique features. Scientists have devised ways to identify humans by the shape of their ears, kneecaps, and even their bottoms. A team at the Advanced Institute of Industrial Technology in Tokyo designed its rump sensor as an anti-theft measure for cars. The group claims that these prototype seats can recognize the owner’s posterior with 98 percent accuracy.

Canadian firm Bionym listens to people’s heart rhythms. While a human heart pounds at different tempos throughout the day, each person has a unique overall pattern, one based on the size and position of the heart within the body. The company’s Nymi bracelet uses electrocardiogram technology to read this heart rhythm and confirm the wearer’s identity.

Of course, biometric scanners are still far from perfect. The iPhone reportedly stumbles when it comes to wet or sweaty fingers. Mr. Vrankulj says the facial recognition software in his Android phone has a hard time with glasses and his newly grown beard – not to mention the false positives from simply holding up an image of the owner’s face.

Some have also voiced concerns about government agencies demanding the fingerprints of certain customers. Apple says such seizures would be impossible. The encrypted data stays locked up within the device, not on any of Apple’s servers. source – CS Monitor.

by NTEB News Desk

Use of Biometric Security Technology at Airports Raises Concerns.


Image: Use of Biometric Security Technology at Airports Raises Concerns

By Courtney Coren

As airports around the world move to more automated airport security functions, concerns are increasing over whether computers will rise to the challenge of actually identifying potential terrorists.

“If you’re sweating profusely, for example, the person checking your ID would notice,” says Arnold Barnett, an aviation-security expert and Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor. “But that computer taking an iris scan wouldn’t.”

Part of keeping travelers safe is “looking at all kinds of things that can’t be captured by an algorithm,” Barnett told  The Wall Street Journal.

About 28 percent of airports around the world are using biometric technology as part of their airport security, which allows airports to streamline the screening process using machines that can verify identities by scanning faces, irises, or fingerprints. Advocates say the technology could make boarding passes obsolete.

London Gatwick Airport conducted an experiment this year with 3,000 British Airways passengers using biometric scanners instead of boarding passes. The machines scanned the irises of the passengers’ eyes when they first checked in, which allowed cameras to identify the travelers at security checkpoints and gates automatically.

While advocates of the technology say that automating some of these processes would free up security personnel to focus on monitoring travelers for suspicious behavior, other experts like Barnett worry that screeners will become too dependent on the technology and it will only serve to dull their senses.

European airports have been much quicker to embrace the biometric technology than American airports, the Journal reported. However, the Transportation Security Administration does currently use the technology for checking employees into some areas and for travelers enrolled in its PreCheck program. It is also used by U.S. Customs and Border Protection at U.S. airports.

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© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Sessions, Graham Push Biometric IDs in Immigration Bill.


Image: Sessions, Graham Push Biometric IDs in Immigration Bill

Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on immigration continued on May 14.

Senators weighing a landmark immigration bill defeated an effort by Republicans Tuesday to require biometric identification — such as fingerprinting — to track who is entering and leaving the country.

The amendment by Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., would have required a biometric system to be in place before any immigrant here illegally could obtain permanent residency or citizenship.

“This is a big, big hole in the system and it’s gone on for years and years,” Sessions said as the Senate Judiciary Committee opened its second day of meetings to plow through hundreds of amendments to legislation remaking the U.S. immigration system, a top priority for President Barack Obama.

“This is one of the reasons the American people have so little confidence in any of the promises we make,” Sessions said.

An author of the bill, Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, agreed with Sessions that biometric IDs are the most secure. But he said authors of the bill determined they were too costly to implement anytime soon. Indeed current law already requires such a system to be in place, but the Department of Homeland Security has been unable to implement it.

Instead the bill seeks electronic scanning of photo IDs.

“Current law is a concept, and there is apparently not a whole lot of will by Republicans or Democrats to make the concept a reality,” Graham said. “What we’ve done is taken the current system and make it better.”

Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said a biometric system would cost $25 billion. He and other Democrats said Sessions’ amendment would simply throw up barriers to a path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants already in the country illegally.

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 12 to 6 to defeat Sessions’ amendment. Graham and Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., joined with the Democrats on the committee in voting it down.

Graham, Flake, Schumer and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., are four of the eight authors of the immigration bill. Since they sit on the Judiciary Committee together they have resolved to vote together against amendments that could strike at the core provisions of the legislation and threaten the fragile alliances behind it.

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© Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Source: NEWSmax.com

Biocryptology Is The Future Of Cashless Transactions.


RELATED STORY: The Mark of the Beast

RAPID CITY, S.D. — Futurists have long proclaimed the coming of a cashless society, where dollar bills and plastic cards are replaced by fingerprint and retina scanners smart enough to distinguish a living, breathing account holder from an identity thief.

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What they probably didn’t see coming was that one such technology would make its debut not in Silicon Valley or MIT but at a small state college in remote western South Dakota, 25 miles from Mount Rushmore.

Two shops on the School of Mines and Technology campus are performing one of the world’s first experiments in Biocryptology — a mix of biometrics (using physical traits for identification) and cryptology (the study of encoding private information). Students at the Rapid City school can buy a bag of potato chips with a machine that non-intrusively detects their hemoglobin to make sure the transaction is legitimate.

Researchers figure their technology would provide a critical safeguard against a morbid scenario sometimes found in spy movies in which a thief removes someone else’s finger to fool the scanner.

On a recent Friday, mechanical engineering major Bernard Keeler handed a Red Bull to a cashier in the Miner’s Shack campus shop, typed his birthdate into a pay pad and swiped his finger. Within seconds, the machine had identified his print and checked that blood was pulsing beneath it, allowing him to make the buy. Afterward, Keeler proudly showed off the receipt he was sent via email on his smartphone.

Fingerprint technology isn’t new, nor is the general concept of using biometrics as a way to pay for goods. But it’s the extra layer of protection — that deeper check to ensure the finger has a pulse — that researchers say sets this technology apart from already-existing digital fingerprint scans, which are used mostly for criminal background checks.

Al Maas, president of Nexus USA — a subsidiary of Spanish-based Hanscan Indentity Management, which patented the technology — acknowledged South Dakota might seem an unlikely locale to test it, but to him, it was a perfect fit.

“I said, if it flies here in the conservative Midwest, it’s going to go anywhere,” Maas said.

Maas grew up near Madison, S.D., and wanted his home state to be the technology’s guinea pig. He convinced Hanscan owner Klaas Zwart that the 2,400-student Mines campus should be used as the starter location.

The students all major in mechanical engineering or hard sciences, which means they’re naturally technologically inclined, said Joseph Wright, the school’s associate vice president for research-economic development.

“South Dakota is a place where people take risks. We’re very entrepreneurial,” Wright said. After Maas and Zwart introduced the idea to students this winter, about 50 stepped forward to take part in the pilot.

“I really wanted to be part of what’s new and see if I could help improve what they already have,” said Phillip Clemen, 19, a mechanical engineering student.

Robert Siciliano, a security expert with McAfee, Inc., minimized potential privacy concerns. ”We are hell bent on privacy issues here in the U.S. We get all up in arms when someone talks about scanning us or recording our information, but then we’ll throw up everything about us on Facebook and give up all of our personal information for 10 percent off at a shoe store for instant credit,” he said.

Jay Stanley, senior policy analyst with the American Civil Liberties Union, said fingerprint technology on its own raises security issues, but he called “liveness detection” a step in the right direction.

“Any security measure can be defeated; it’s a question of making it harder,” he said. The key to keeping biometric identification from becoming Big Brother-like is to make it voluntary and ensure that the information scanned is used exactly as promised, Stanley said.

Brian Wiles, a Miles mechanical engineering major, said it’s exciting to be beta testing technology that could soon be worldwide. ”There was some hesitation, but the fact that it’s the first in the world — that’s the whole point of this school,” said Wiles, 22. “We’re innovators.” source – NY Daily News.

by NTEB News Desk

Israel Launches New Biometric Database Tracking Project.


Israel unwittingly heads for the ‘time of Jacob’s trouble’

“Alas! for that day is great, so that none is like it: it is even the time of Jacob’s trouble; but he shall be saved out of it.” Jeremiah 30:7

The Old Testament prophets foresaw a time preceding the Day of the Lord, where Israel would go trough trial and testing, the likes of which it had not ever seen before. For those of us living now in 2013, who have witnessed the horrors the Jews went through in the 20th century, the prophecies take on an even greater significance. Whether you perceive the biometric database tracking project mentioned in this story as blessing or a curse really depends on if you believe the Jewish prophets or not. But before you fully make  up your mind, know this: for the last 3,500 years, they have had a 100% accuracy rate.

From Israel National News: Despite protests by privacy groups, Israel will begin amassing biometric data on its citizens beginning Tuesday. The pilot program for the biometric database will greatly enhance the ability of authorities to identify terrorists, supporters of the project say – while those opposed believe that the program will give the state unprecedented opportunity to control the lives of Israelis.

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Technology has been a great blessing, but in the last days, it becomes a great curse.

The test program, which will continue for two years, will be voluntary. Israelis 16 and older who live in Ashdod, Petach Tikvah, and Kfar Sava will be asked if they want their fingerprints, a high resolution photo, and other information in a database that will be accessible to security forces, the courts, and, in some circumstances, police.

The law authorizing establishment of the database was passed in 2009, with the most enthusiastic supporter MK Meir Sheetrit, now number 5 on Tzippy Livni’s Hatnua list. Several human rights and privacy groups have filed numerous petitions against the project with the High Court. The court ordered the limited test program, and plans to review the program, and its impact, after the test period. source – Israel National News.

by NTEB News Desk

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