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Posts tagged ‘Des Moines Iowa’

US Rep. Tom Latham Won’t Seek Re-election in 2014.


Image: US Rep. Tom Latham Won't Seek Re-election in 2014

U.S. Rep. Tom Latham announced Tuesday he won’t seek re-election in 2014, creating a potentially competitive race for a seat that likely would have favored the 10-term Iowa Republican.

The 65-year-old Republican from Clive will have spent 20 years in Congress and is Iowa’s senior U.S. House member. The decision creates an open seat that includes the Des Moines area in central Iowa and the vast rural tracts of southern and western Iowa.

The news, coming late Tuesday, took Iowa’s GOP senior strategists by surprise.

“It’s a bombshell politically in Iowa because he was so strong,” said Doug Gross, a longtime aide to Republican Gov. Terry Branstad and former nominee for governor. “It throws open a congressional seat in a very, very important district I think you’ll have a scrum on both sides. I think you’ll have lots of interest.”

Democrat Staci Appel, a former state senator from Ackworth, had already announced her plans to seek the seat before Latham’s decision.

Latham was heavily courted this year by Iowa Republicans, especially Branstad, and the national GOP to seek Iowa’s open Senate seat in 2014, but he turned that down in February. Five-term Democratic Sen. Tom Harkin announced in January that he would retire, and several Republicans have announced their candidacies.

Latham is a member of the Appropriations Committee and chairman of the transportation subcommittee. He’s known for his friendship with House Speaker John Boehner and his love of golf.

© Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Source: Newsmax.com

Iowa Board Votes to End ‘Tele-Med’ Abortions.


pregnant woman

The Iowa Board of Medicine took a final step on Friday to stop Planned Parenthood of the Heartland from providing abortion-inducing drugs to women via a video-conferencing system, a practice used to serve women in rural areas without doctors.

The board voted 8-2 to ban the practice, with most members arguing the best standard of care for a woman seeking an abortion is to have a doctor perform a physical exam and talk face-to-face with the patient.

Currently, women in remote parts of the state who live far from abortion providers can speak with a physician through Internet video and then take the medication to induce an early-term abortion.

Among those voting to ban telemedicine for abortions was Monsignor Frank Bognanno, pastor of Christ the King Catholic Parish in Des Moines and appointed to the board by Republican Governor Terry Branstad, an abortion foe.

“This is a big deal … This isn’t like taking an aspirin,” Bognanno said.

Ann Gales, a lawyer and board member, voted against the ban, arguing for more examination of the issue and raising concern that the vote was being rushed.

“If this is the right rule, it will still be the right rule after we engage in a more thorough discussion,” Gales said.

State laws requiring doctors to be present when abortion-inducing drugs are administered are becoming increasingly common, particularly in states run by Republican governors or Republican controlled legislatures. Eleven states have them, said Elizabeth Nash, state issues manager for the Guttmacher Institute, a pro-choice research group.

Abortion rights advocates say the laws are unfair to rural residents who do not have access to doctors and depend on telemedicine to get abortions, Nash said.

Greg Hoversten, D.O., the Iowa medical board’s chairman, voted for the ban.

“How can any of us possibly find that a medical abortion performed over the Internet is as safe as one provided by a physician in person, at the bedside?” Hoversten asked.

The ban on so-called “tele-med” abortions was set to take effect on November 6.

A lawyer for Planned Parenthood told reporters after the vote that, “all options are on the table,” including possible legal action to prevent the rule from taking effect.

© 2013 Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.

Source: CHARISMA NEWS.

KAY HENDERSON/REUTERS

Pastors Lay Hands on Rand Paul, Ted Cruz During Prayer Meeting.


Rand Paul
Iowa pastors pray for Sen. Rand Paul (center) and his wife, Kelly. (CBN News)

It was a sight to behold inside a conference ballroom at the downtown Marriott hotel in Des Moines, Iowa, as hundreds of Iowa pastors called out to God and prayed over two U.S. senators, both of whom seem interested in running for president of the United States.

Sen. Ted Cruz and Sen. Rand Paul came to Iowa Friday to speak at this Pastors and Pews event, organized by influential evangelical political operative David LaneThe Brody File got an up-close look and access to the private event.

Cruz, who received a warm greeting, spoke for about 30 minutes and then took questions from the audience. He outlined how he championed religious freedom cases ranging from the Ten Commandments to the Mojave Cross case. He touched on how to go about eliminating Obamacare; he called for abolishing the IRS (which received a standing ovation), and on the issue of marriage he said, “There’s no issue where we need to be more on our knees … we are facing an assault on marriage.”

On spiritual matters, he told the pastors that, “We are in a battle to turn this country around.” Later, in a one-on-one sit-down interview with The Brody File, he said this country is badly in need of spiritual revival. He charged the pastors to step up and speak boldly about the issues facing our country today. He compared all of them to Esther, saying the biblical woman was put in a position of leadership, “for such a time as this.”

Afterwards, pastors gathered around Cruz and his father (who was on hand for the conference) to pray for them.

As for Paul, he spoke for about 20 minutes and then the pastors prayed for the senator and his wife, Kelly. Paul spent the bulk of his time explain how liberty, freedom and virtue go hand in hand. His biggest applause lines came when he talked about his dedication to the pro-life issue and how he believes America needs to cut off aid to countries that hate America.

He briefly addressed his foreign policy views, explaining that we should be focused on peace not war. He invoked the name of Jesus saying how He says in the Bible, “Blessed are the peacemakers.” However, he made clear that he was not against war and if war was necessary, he would make sure America would win it decisively.

There’s no doubt Paul and Cruz have begun thinking about running for president in 2016 and this event was a chance to introduce themselves to a pivotal group of pastors who will play a significant role in the presidential selection process since Iowa is always the first state in the nation to vote. However, the main goal of the two-day conference was to really motivate pastors to speak boldly about issues from the pulpit and to awake Christian voters, who may agree that America’s culture is going in the toilet, but sit on their hands and do nothing about it.

While getting more evangelicals to the polls is a political goal of the conference, there is a much deeper spiritual purpose. These pastors want to see spiritual revival in America. Speaker after speaker implored them to simply preach the word from the Bible and leave the outcome to God.

A big theme was praying for another Great Awakening in this country but the pastors here agreed that it could only come if evangelicals truly repent and get down on their knees in prayer. In other words, there won’t be any Great Awakening if Christians don’t get serious in their prayer life.

Source: CHARISMA NEWS.

DAVID BRODY/CBN NEWS

Sen. Cruz and Paul Urge Conservative Christians to Get Involved.


Two Republican senators who are widely considered to be viable contenders for a 2016 presidential run, were in Des Moines, Iowa, on Friday urging conservative Christians to get involved politically.

Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Rand Paul, R-Ky., spoke to a group of at least 400 evangelical pastors and their wives at the Iowa Renewal Project, with Cruz telling them “to hold party leaders accountable,” The Washington Post reports.

“Jesus reminds us what our goal should be when he proclaims: ‘Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God,'” Paul said. “This does not mean we never go to war. But it means we should do so reluctantly, and seek an end expeditiously.”

Cruz quoted from the book of Isaiah. “‘My people perish for lack of knowledge,'” said Cruz. “And the prophet Ezekiel charged us: ‘Son of man, you are a watchman for the house of Israel.'”

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus attended, and all three men knelt before the podium for prayer from the pastors.

African-American and Latino pastors from outside the state also attended the speeches. Priebus said he hopes conservative pastors of all races will encourage their flocks to get out and vote in the 2014 midterms and the 2016 presidential election.

Both Cruz and Paul said they see traditional family values as the “fundamental building block of society,” but both also have libertarian leanings and believe individual states should define marriage according to their own beliefs.

The Iowa Renewal Project was created by Californian David Lane, who said he hopes to start similar groups in other states.

“We are mobilizing this constituency,” Lande said. “This is not about Republicans and Democrats. It’s about returning American to its Judeo-Christian heritage.”

© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

By Greg Richter

Midwest hit by its first major snowstorm of season.


  • Elementary school students, some escorted by parents, cross a snowy street en route to school as a blizzard dropped snow over Boulder, Colo., Wednesday Dec. 19, 2012. A storm that has dumped more than a foot of snow in the Rocky Mountains is heading east and is forecast to bring the first major winter storm of the season to the central plains and Midwest. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)Enlarge GalleryElementary school students, some escorted by parents, cross a snowy street en route to school as a blizzard dropped snow over Boulder, Colo., Wednesday Dec. 19, 2012. A storm that has dumped more than a foot …

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The first major snowstorm of the season began its slow eastward march across the Midwest early Thursday, leaving at least three people dead, creating treacherous driving conditions and threatening to disrupt some of the nation’s busiest airports ahead of the holiday weekend.

Forecasters warned that heavy snow coupled with strong winds could create blizzard conditions from Kansas to Wisconsin — and guaranteed a white Christmas in some places — after the storm blanketed the Rocky Mountains earlier in the week.

Iowa and Nebraska took a heavy hit from the storm, with nearly a foot of snow in Des Moines and 8.6 inches in Omaha, Neb.

Thomas Shubert, a clerk at a store in Gretna near Omaha, said his brother drove him to work in his 4-by-4 truck but that some of his neighbors weren’t so fortunate.

“I saw some people in my neighborhood trying to get out. They made it a few feet, and that was about it,” Shubert said Thursday. “I haven’t seen many cars on the road. There are a few brave souls out, but mostly trucks and plows.”

By sunrise in Des Moines, the snow was starting to taper off, but that would not be the end of it, warned Kevin Skow, a National Weather Service meteorologist in the city.

“It’s soon going to become less of a snow event and more of a wind event,” Skow said.

The airport at Creston, Iowa, recorded the highest winds, with a gust of 53 mph. Skow said wind gusts would grow stronger later Thursday, creating whiteout conditions, before dying down by the evening.

Meteorologist Scott Dergan said the snow cover would drag temperatures much lower in Nebraska and Iowa.

“We’re talking single digits,” Dergan said. “We may even see some sub-zero temperatures in Nebraska. This cold weather will stick around for several days, maybe until the day after Christmas. So we’re definitely going to have a white Christmas.”

Before the storm, several cities in the Midwest had broken records for the number of consecutive days without measurable snow.

Chicago commuters began Thursday with heavy fog and cold, driving rain, and forecasters said snow would hit the Midwestern metropolis by mid-afternoon. Officials at O’Hare International Airport reported some flight delays and more than 90 cancellations. United Airlines said it would waive change fees for travelers who have to change their plans for travel through O’Hare because of the storm.

The weather service warned of poor visibility due to driving snow in much of the region and warned drivers to stay off roads in some areas. Transportation officials shut down parts of Interstate 29 in Missouri early Thursday, and Interstate 80 in Nebraska remained closed due to blowing snow.

“We’re just seeing a few flurries this morning, but because of the wind, travel is pretty treacherous, especially into Iowa, as the storm moves east,” Dergan said.

In southeastern Wisconsin, where a blizzard warning was in effect and winds of up to 45 mph were expected to create whiteout conditions, sheriff’s officials said slick conditions led to at least two fatalities late Wednesday when a driver lost control of his car in Rock County, about 90 miles northwest of Chicago. In southeastern Utah, a woman who tried to walk for help after her car became stuck in snow died Tuesday night. Search and rescue crews on snowmobiles found her buried in the snow just a few miles from her car.

The owner of the Norske Nook restaurant and bakery in Osseo, a town in west-central Wisconsin that woke up to at least 10 inches of snow, said “blizzardy” conditions were not unusual for the area and that the weather would not upset her business.

“It’s our policy to stay open for the customers,” said Jean Zingshiem. “In case someone is stranded they’ll have somewhere to go.”

On the southern edge of the storm system, high winds damaged homes and downed trees in central Arkansas, the weather service said. A powerful storm peeled the roofs off buildings and toppled trucks in Mobile, Ala., but injured no one. Tornado warnings remained in effect in parts of Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama early Thursday.

Hundreds of schools across the Midwest canceled classes Thursday because of heavy overnight snow. Kansas City Power & Light reported about 16,000 scattered power outages in northwest Missouri and northeast Kansas. ComEd said it was preparing additional crews and equipment to cope with expected power outages in northern Illinois.

Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad closed all state offices until noon.

The moisture was welcome to farmers in the drought-parched region, but Meteorologist Kris Sanders said the storm wouldn’t make much of a dent. In Kansas, for example, some areas are more than 12 inches below normal precipitation for the year.

“It’s not going to have a big effect, maybe only a half-inch of liquid precipitation. It’s not helping us out much,” Sanders said.

Sanders said another storm similar to the current one could bring additional snow on Christmas or the day after.

___

John Milburn reported from Topeka, Kan. Associated Press writers Heather Hollingsworth in Kansas City, Mo.; Colleen Slevin in Denver; Carla K. Johnson and Jason Keyser in Chicago; Margery Beck in Omaha, Neb.; Jill Bleed in Little Rock, Ark.; and Dinesh Ramde and Gretchen Ehlke in Milwaukee contributed to this report.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ and JOHN MILBURN | Associated Press

Midwest hit by its first major snowstorm of season.


 

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DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The first major snowstorm of the season began its slow eastward march across the Midwest early Thursday, leaving at least three people dead, creating treacherous driving conditions and threatening to disrupt some of the nation’s busiest airports ahead of the holiday weekend.

Forecasters warned that heavy snow coupled with strong winds could create blizzard conditions from Kansas to Wisconsin — and guaranteed a white Christmas in some places — after the storm blanketed the Rocky Mountains earlier in the week.

The storm dropped nearly a foot of snow in Des Moines, but the storm wasn’t as dangerous as earlier feared because everyone had good warning of the approaching havoc, said Kevin Skow, a National Weather Service meteorologist in the city. But wind might become a concern, he warned.

“It’s starting to taper off,” Skow said of the snow early Thursday. “It’s soon going to become less of a snow event and more of a wind event.”

The airport at Creston, Iowa, recorded the highest winds, with a gust of 53 mph. Skow said wind gusts would grow stronger later Thursday, creating whiteout conditions, before dying down by the evening.

Meteorologist Scott Dergan said the snow cover would drag temperatures much lower in Nebraskaand Iowa.

“We’re talking single digits,” Dergan said. “We may even see some sub-zero temperatures in Nebraska. This cold weather will stick around for several days, maybe until the day after Christmas. So we’re definitely going to have a white Christmas.”

On the southern edge of the storm system, high winds damaged homes and downed trees in central Arkansas, the weather service said. A powerful storm peeled the roofs off buildings and toppled trucks in Mobile, Ala., but injured no one. Tornado warnings remained in effect in parts of Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama early Thursday.

Iowa native Laurie Harry said the weather probably wouldn’t stop her from starting up her car Thursday morning.

“If I need to get into work, I’ll be here,” said Harry, a manager at a Casey’s General Store in the western Iowa town of Atlantic. “We’ve had snow before. Iowans know what to expect. We’re used to it.”

Forecasters said the heaviest snow could be expected across a swath extending from northwestern Missouri into Milwaukee, Chicago and Michigan, with predictions of as much as a foot of snow in some areas. Before the storm, several cities in the Midwest had broken records for the number of consecutive days without measurable snow.

The weather service warned of poor visibility due to driving snow in much of the region and warned drivers to stay off roads in some areas. Transportation officials shut down parts of Interstate 29 in Missouri early Thursday, and Interstate 80 in Nebraska remained closed due to blowing snow.

“Just north of Interstate 80 is where the heaviest band of snow set up,” Dergan said. “We’re just seeing a few flurries this morning, but because of the wind, travel is pretty treacherous, especially into Iowa, as the storm moves east.”

In southeastern Wisconsin, where a blizzard warning was in effect and winds of up to 45 mph were expected to create whiteout conditions, sheriff’s officials said slick conditions led to at least two fatalities late Wednesday when a driver lost control of his car in Rock County, about 90 miles northwest of Chicago. In southeastern Utah, a woman who tried to walk for help after her car became stuck in snow died Tuesday night. Search and rescue crews on snowmobiles found her buried in the snow just a few miles from her car.

Chicago commuters awoke Thursday to heavy fog and cold, driving rain, and forecasters said snow would hit the Midwestern metropolis by mid-afternoon. Officials at the city’s two international airports reported some delays and cancellations but said most incoming and outgoing flights were on time. United Airlines said it would waive change fees for travelers who have to change their plans for travel through O’Hare International Airport.

Hundreds of schools across the affected region canceled classes Thursday because of heavy overnight snow. Kansas City Power & Light reported about 16,000 scattered power outages in northwest Missouri and northeast Kansas.

The moisture was welcome to farmers in the drought-parched region, but Meteorologist Kris Sanders said the storm wouldn’t make much of a dent. In Kansas, for example, some areas are more than 12 inches below normal precipitation for the year.

“It’s not going to have a big effect, maybe only a half-inch of liquid precipitation. It’s not helping us out much,” Sanders said.

Sanders said another storm similar to the current one could bring additional snow on Christmas or the day after.

___

John Milburn reported from Topeka, Kan. Associated Press writers Heather Hollingsworth in Kansas City, Mo.; Colleen Slevin in Denver; Carla Johnson in Chicago; Margery Beck in Omaha, Neb.; Jill Bleed in Little Rock, Ark.; and Gretchen Ehlke in Milwaukee contributed to this report.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ and JOHN MILBURN | Associated Press

Des Moines store near Obama rally has a message for the Secret Service.


 

Sign outside Raygun clothing store in Des Moines, Iowa. (Chris Moody/Yahoo News)

DES MOINES, Iowa—President Barack Obama is planning an outdoor rally here on Monday, but one store within the event’s security zone is taking a stand against Secret Service searches inside the shop.

A sign on the window of Raygun, a clothing store that sells quirky T-shirts, tells Secret Service agents who intend to “sweep” the premises before Obama’s speech that it does “not consent” to any searches. The sign also added a little humor, too: “It’s not that there’s anything illegal in here, we just employ several Colombian prostitutes and don’t want to tempt you guys,” the sign reads, a reference to news reports earlier this year about some agents who had solicited prostitutes in South America.

The Obama campaign was not amused. A store clerk told Yahoo News that the sign went up Monday morning, and Obama staffers have asked for its removal. The store is refusing.

Update 6:45 PM: The sign was removed from the window before Obama’s rally started Monday evening.

Source:
By  | The Ticket YAHOO NEWS.

An emotional Obama makes his closing argument in Iowa.


President Barack Obama in Des Moines, Iowa. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

DES MOINES, Iowa — On the final night of his campaign for reelection, President Barack Obama returned to Iowa, the state where his candidacy first took root more than four years ago.

The event had all the trappings of a typical Obama rally: American flags lined the risers above cheerful Democrats, generators hummed in the distance, powering the flood lights, and a crowd of 20,000 filled the boulevard that led to the Iowa state capital building. After a prayer, the Pledge of Allegiance, the National Anthem, a performance by Bruce Springsteen and an introduction from his wife, Michelle, Obama approached the stage to the music of U2, just as he has done so many times before.

But this night, quite likely the final presidential rally of Obama’s career, was different. The president appeared  more patient and familiar, taking time to tell stories instead of repeating campaign slogans. His remarks retained the outline of his stump speech, but he devoted much of the night to reminiscing about his first campaign in 2008 and tried to re-energize his supporters with anecdotes from the past. While he spoke, a photographer captured a moment when a tear appeared to flow down his cheek.

“I came back to ask you to help us finish what we’ve started because this is where our movement for change began,” Obama said, pointing behind him to the modest building that housed his first Iowa campaign office in 2008. “Right here.”

The location is meaningful for the president. Before the Iowa caucuses of January 2008, Obama was seen as little more than a long shot challenger to then-New York Sen. Hillary Clinton, whose nomination seemed inevitable. But when Iowa Democrats visited their caucus sites, they chose Obama. The momentum would ultimately squeeze Clinton out of the lead and launch Obama on a journey that took him to the White House.

Four years later, after the first term of a presidency that pursued often divisive policies, Obama has returned to these Iowan stomping grounds–older and, admittedly, his hair grayer–to try and close the deal.

In his speech Monday, which went on longer than his usual campaign address, Obama recalled the earliest days of his first campaign. He paid homage to Edith S. Childs, a local councilwoman in South Carolina who was one of his earliest supporters and who coined the chant, “Fired up! Ready to go,” which became a staple of his campaign in 2008.

He also reflected on his own presidency, conceding that he knew that his supporters sometimes found themselves “frustrated by the pace of change.”

“I promise you,” Obama told the crowd. “So have I.”

It was all the more reason, Obama argued, to re-elect him. While the president did not once mention his opponent by name in this speech, he warned that “progress” would be lost and vowed to fight against “the status quo” in his second term.

Whether Americans will offer him a fresh opportunity may be known in the next 24 hours, and both campaigns are making a play for Iowa. Despite the state’s modest six Electoral College votes, Iowa has played an outsized role this election cycle. Both candidates have invested significant resources into securing victory here. While it’s not an absolute must-win, Obama’s efforts here have forced Romney to secure support elsewhere, just in case.

While Romney has events planned in Ohio and Pennsylvania Tuesday, Obama decided to make Monday night his final public appearance before election night. He’ll spend part of the day Tuesday playing basketball while the votes are counted.

“It’s out of my hands now,” Obama said. “It’s in yours. All of it depends on what you do.”

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By  | The Ticket

Romney pledges bipartisanship in final push.


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DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney crisscrossed the nation on Sunday renewing his pledge to bring a fresh spirit of cooperation to Washington.

He’s also promising to pursue an agenda that would alienate most Democrats on his first day in office.

In the first of four campaign stops on Sunday, Romney remindedIowa voters that on Day One, he would begin to repeal President Barack Obama’s signature health care law. He also wants to weaken labor unions and overturn Democrat-backed legislation that overhauled the nation’s financial system.

But the polarizing priorities are not his focus at swelling rallies in the presidential contest’s final hours.

With an eye toward undecided voters — women and independents in particular — Romney is vowing to work closely with “good Democrats” if elected. It’s a message that fueled Obama’s candidacy four years ago and remains a key piece of the incumbent’s message. But for Romney, the bipartisan appeal became the focus of his closing argument only in recent weeks.

“On Nov. 6 we’re going to come together for a better future. On Nov. 7, we’ll get to work,” Romney told an Iowa crowd estimated at 4,400. “You reach across the street to that neighbor with the other yard sign. And I’ll reach across the aisle to people in the other party, people in good faith, because this time demands bringing America together.”

But beyond recent campaign trail speeches, there is little sign that Romney has laid the groundwork to bridge the partisan divide in Washington.

He offers a distinctly partisan tone in a new ad running in North Dakota this week, urging voters there to elect Senate candidate Rick Berg to “stop the liberal Reid-Pelosi agenda.”

And Romney had little, if any, communication with Democratic leaders in recent days as he monitored the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. He reached out to East Coast governors for updates, but only Republicans.

And his campaign would not say whether Romney’s transition team, which has already begun to craft legislation and executive orders designed for release on his first day in office, has reached out to Democrats on Capitol Hill.

“I don’t think there’s been any outreach,” adviser Kevin Madden said aboard Romney’s campaign plane Sunday. “Once we win, I think the governor is going to do his best to work with as many folks as possible.”

Romney’s Day One agenda includes a plan he dubbed the “Down Payment on Fiscal Sanity Act” to cut nondiscretionary spending by 5 percent. He also promises to issue what he calls “An Order to Pave the Way to End Obamacare” and an “Order to Empower American Businesses and Workers” that would reverse policies “that tilt the playing field in favor of organized labor,” according to Romney’s website.

Democrats have already vowed to block what they call Romney’s “tea party agenda.”

“Mitt Romney’s fantasy that Senate Democrats will work with him to pass his ‘severely conservative’ agenda is laughable,” Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid said recently. “Senate Democrats are committed to defending the middle class, and we will do everything in our power to defend them against Mitt Romney’s tea party agenda.”

Asked about Reid’s comments, Romney surrogate Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said Sunday on CNN that “to have that kind of response from the Democrats in Congress is discouraging, but, look, I think at the end of the day even Harry Reid and even the Democrats who might take that point of view at this point are going to say we’ve got to solve these problems.”

Indeed, Obama, too, offered a cooperative tone while campaigning in New Hampshire on Sunday.

“As long as I’m president I will work with anybody of any party to move this country forward,” Obama said. “If you want to break the gridlock in Congress, you’ll vote for leaders who feel the same way, whether they are Democrats or Republicans or independents.”

In Iowa, Romney said that only he can work with Congress.

“He’s ignored them, he’s attacked them, he’s blamed them,” Romney said of the president. “And remember the debt ceiling? That’s going to come up again. And then there’ll be a threat of shutdown and default as there has been before. And that freezes the economy.”

The Republican continued: “I’ll bring people together. I won’t just represent one party, I’ll represent one nation.”

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By KASIE HUNT and STEVE PEOPLES | Associated Press

President Obama Accuses Mitt Romney of ‘Cow-Pie Distortion’ on Debt, Deficits.


DES MOINES, Iowa –  On his first visit back to the Iowa state fairgrounds since the 2008 campaign, President Obama used a grassroots on Thursday night rally to launch sharp new attacks against rival Mitt Romney over the debt and deficit and vigorously defend his own handling of the same.

The venue holds symbolic value for Democrats because it was here, in August that Romney made his   now-famous declaration that “corporations are people, my friend.”

Obama thrust the Republican candidate’s unflattering moment front and center early on.

“The worldview that Gov. Romney gained from his experience as a financial CEO explains something. It explains why the last time he visited these same fairgrounds, he famously declared ‘corporations are people,'” Obama said, drawing loud boos from the crowd of 2,500.

“That’s what he said, that’s what he called them,” Obama added. “It also explains why, when a woman right here in Iowa shared a story of her financial struggles, he gave her an answer out of an economics textbook.  He said, ‘Our productivity equals our income.’  Let me tell you something: We believe in the profit motive. We believe that risk-takers and investors should be rewarded. That’s what makes our economy so dynamic. But we also believe that everybody should have opportunity.”

Ahead of the event, Obama’s re-election campaign circulated a video of Romney’s Iowa State Fair remarks, all aimed at bolstering their claim that the former private equity executive was a wealth-seeker who put investors’ interests ahead of the middle class.   Several of the campaign’s major, multi-state TV ad buys – each of which have included Iowa – have touched on the same theme.

Obama offered his most spirited attacks on Romney over his claims about the burgeoning federal debt and record-high deficits that have been incurred over the past three and a half years.

“They’ve got the nerve to go around saying that they’re somehow going to bring down the deficit,” he said, referring to Romney’s budget blueprint. “Economists who’ve looked at his plan say it would swell our deficits by trillions of dollars, even with the drastic cuts he’s called for [on] things like education, agriculture and Medicaid.

“He promises to do that on day one,” Obama added, referring to the new Romney TV ad by the same name.  “We don’t need that. That’s going backwards. We’re going forwards.”

“Forward” is Obama’s re-election campaign slogan.

Romney, on his most   recent visit to Des Moines earlier this month, argued that Obama has presided over a “prairie fire of debt,” and told voters, “Every day we fail to act we feed that fire with our own lack of resolve.”

His campaign and the Republican National Committee have also stressed that during Obama’s first term, $5 trillion was added to the debt, which now exceeds $15.6 trillion.

“A president who broke his promise to cut the deficit in half by the end of his first term has no standing when it comes to fiscal responsibility. By the end of this year, President Obama will have presided over a record-shattering four consecutive trillion-dollar deficits and added an historic amount to our national debt,” said Romney spokesman Ryan Williams.

“When you listen to President Obama’s campaign speeches, it’s as if he’s forgotten that he’s been president for nearly four years and has a record to defend. President Obama has proven beyond all doubt that he is not serious about fixing our country’s spending problem.”

Offering a rebuttal tonight, Obama said that his administration has taken fiscal issues seriously, attributing high deficits to the “depth of the recession.” He said Romney’s claims were divorced from reality.

“I know Gov. Romney came to Des Moines last week worried about a   ‘prairie fire of debt.’ That’s what he said: ‘Prairie fire,'” Obama said. “But, you know, he left out some facts. His speech was more like a cow-pie distortion.”

“I don’t know whose record he twisted the most, mine or his,” he added.

Obama argued that the pace   of federal government spending during his tenure has been the slowest of any president in 60 years.

“By the way, it’s like the Republicans run up the tab and then we’re sitting there and they’ve left the restaurant,” he said. “Why did you order all those steaks and martinis?”

The president said Romney’s budget – which includes new tax cuts for wealthier Americans – would not be the deficit slayer he claims it would be.

“Oh, by the way, something else he hasn’t told you is how he’d pay for a new $5 trillion tax cut,” Obama said.  “That’s like trying to put out a prairie fire with some gasoline.”

Obama claims his plan would cut the deficit by $4 trillion over 10 years through a combination of spending cuts and tax hikes.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By Devin Dwyer | ABC OTUS News

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