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Posts tagged ‘Illegal immigration’

Rivers released 275 suspects Boko Haram arrest sterrorists.


Boko-Haram-members-42-suspected

Two hundred and seventy-five persons among those held by the Police in Rivers State on the suspicion that they are members of the dreaded Boko Haram group, have been released.

Deputy Commissioner State Criminal Investigation Department (DC/CID), Sam Ukaula told reporters in Port Harcourt yesterday that 19 of those arrested are being held for further interrogation.

The arrest of the people travelling in buses on the Rivers –Imo border, has generated huge interest. The House of Representatives has ordered as probe into the

arrests. .

Ukaula said the 19, whose mission in Port Harcourt was not clear, include an illegal immigrant from Niger Republic. One of them, he said, had spent ammunition on him.

The police officer said the interception of the vehicles and arrest of the occupants was necessitated by information to Commissioner of Police Mbu Joseph Mbu, that a great number of the killer squads had been dispatched to cause havoc on Port Harcourt residents.

He explained that the action of the Police was meant to nip the intended trouble in the bud. He absolved the police of political connection.

Earlier reports said those arrested were 320, but Ukaula said yesterday that they were 294.

The suspects were arrested on Sunday morning at the boundary between Imo and Rivers states, in a convoy of 17 buses from Jigawa state. They were held at the state CID until they were screened and freed.

Ukaula said a team of security agencies in the state, including the Army, Police Immigration, customs and SSS assembled to screen the suspects before the 275 could be released.

He said: “It would be recalled that on Friday night of January 24, 2014, the Commissioner of Police received an alarming information that members of Boko Haram were being massively transported to Rivers state particularly, Port Harcourt from certain parts of the country for the purpose of causing havoc on innocent citizens.

Source: Radio Biafra.

Obama’s New DHS Chief: Amnesty for Illegals ‘Matter of National Security’.


Image: Obama's New DHS Chief: Amnesty for Illegals 'Matter of National Security'

The new Homeland Security secretary says an earned path to citizenship for the roughly 11 million immigrants living in the United States illegally is a matter of national security.

It was the first time Jeh Johnson, who had little experience with immigration policy before he was appointed, had outlined his approach on the subject.

The Defense Department’s former top lawyer, who worked on U.S. drone policies and helped end the Pentagon’s ban on gays in the military, said offering a path to citizenship would encourage such immigrants “to come out of the shadow, to be accountable, to participate in the American experience.”

In his speech last week at the U.S. Conference of Mayors, Johnson said the vast majority of immigrants here illegally have been in the country for more than 10 years and offering a path to citizenship is “a matter (of) who we are as Americans.”

Johnson was sworn in as the fourth Homeland Security secretary late last year. While he has been making visits to the Mexican border and meeting with immigration enforcement officials, he had yet to give specifics on his immigration views until this speech.

Johnson was considered well-versed in matters of security, but many questioned his credentials on immigration.

During his Senate confirmation hearing last year, Johnson listed “common-sense immigration reform” among the top priorities of the department but did not provide any details.

Johnson’s brief remarks on immigration mirror those of his predecessor and President Barack Obama.

Obama and congressional Democrats have long pushed for a sweeping immigration bill that would, among other things, create a path to citizenship for immigrants living in the country illegally who don’t pose a threat to national security or public safety. Last year, the Democratic-controlled Senate passed a bill that also included a provision to nearly double the size of the Border Patrol.

Republicans have objected to allowing immigrants to gain citizenship before the border is secured.

Johnson did not address how he planned to direct immigration enforcement efforts.

In the absence of viable immigration legislation in Congress, Obama has approved a series of policy directives that largely have shielded various groups of immigrants from deportation. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, announced shortly before the 2012 presidential election, is the most significant and allows many young immigrants who arrived in the United States as children to apply for a work permit and a two-year reprieve from deportation.

Republican lawmakers have decried the programs as back-door amnesty and have asked Johnson to commit to enforcing immigration laws as they exist, including deporting immigrants in the country illegally.
© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Source: Newsmax.com

Conservatives Brace for Boehner Immigration Plan.


Image: Conservatives Brace for Boehner Immigration Plan

By Newsmax Wires

House Republicans led by Speaker John Boehner are preparing to unveil a major immigration initiative this week that many hope could trigger movement on an issue that has troubled the nation for decades.

The brief outline of immigration principles Boehner will unveil at a three-day Republican leadership retreat in Cambridge, Md., will include strengthening border security and creating new visas for foreign workers, and offer a path to legalization – though not necessarily citizenship – for the nation’s 11 million to 12 million undocumented immigrants, according to people briefed on the deliberations who spoke to The New York Times and The Washington Post.

Coming on the week of President Barack Obama’s “State of the Union” address, which will be given Tuesday night, some Democrats are expressing hope that new momentum could yield results after months in which the issue languished in the House.

On Sunday, speaking on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Sen. Rand Paul said there is some room for compromise on immigration with the Obama administration.

Latest: Do You Support Giving Illegals Citizenship? Vote Here Now 

“We don’t agree on the whole comprehensive package with the Democrats, but I’ll bet you about half of it we agree on,” Paul said. “The question is: are we willing to narrow our focus and go after things that we can agree to and get them done, or are we going to stay so polarized that we always have to have our way or the highway?”

Administration officials and others told the Post that there still is a long way to go before any compromise could be reached between the House and Senate, which approved a bipartisan plan to overhaul border-control laws last June.

“It’s a very big deal, and there’s a path here that could get it done,” Cecilia Munoz, the White House’s director of domestic policy, told the Post.

Specifically, Boehner’s initiative would come in the form of simple statement of principles.

The central idea is to put forth separate bills dealing with such issues as:

  • border security
  • the hiring of illegal immigrants
  • guest-worker rules
  • a path to citizenship for those who arrived in the country illegally as children
  • a plan to legalize undocumented workers who have American family ties or sponsoring employers

This is far different from the view long held by Obama and Democrats that immigration could be taken up in a single, sweeping bill.

But Obama and Democratic leaders have said they are open to the multiple-bill approach favored by Boehner and key Republicans like Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida. Rubio’s backing is crucial for the key bloc of tea party Republicans in both the House and the Senate.

Fixing the immigration crisis is believed key to the electoral fortunes of both Democrats and Republicans. Obama is facing mounting pressure from immigration advocates to halt deportations, which are on pace to soon top the 2 million mark during his tenure. That’s more than the George W. Bush administration deported in its entire eight years.

Republican Party leaders, meanwhile, are convinced that their party must broaden its appeal to Latinos and Asian Americans. Obama won reelection in 2012 with the support of more than 70 percent of those voters.

On Friday, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned Republicans that fixing immigration is essential to their plans to take the Senate in 2014 and recapture the White House in 2016.

“If you are against the fastest-growing voting bloc in the country, you and your party don’t have a future,” Bloomberg said flatly at a forum on immigration Friday with Michigan Republican Gov. Rick Snyder and former Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez, who served in President George W. Bush’s administration.

“The principles they lay out I’m sure won’t satisfy everybody,” Bloomberg said. But, he added, “if we can make some compromises here for the good of the country, I think we have a very good chance for the first time in a long time of changing something that is really damaging all of us.”

Boehner’s plan is designed to assuage concerns of conservative Republicans who oppose outright citizenship or amnesty for illegal immigrants who arrived in the country as adults, but do not oppose a path toward legalization.

Alfonso Aguilar, of the Latino Partnership for Conservative Principles, said the question now is whether Democrats would kill any plan toward legalization that does not include citizenship. He pointed to a Pew Hispanic Center poll that showed 61 percent of immigrant Latinos place legalization higher on their preferences than citizenship, the Post reported.

Conservative opponents of any compromise on immigration reform had hoped to obstruct the Senate immigration bill in a Senate-House conference committee. However, party leaders appear to be trying to come up with a compromise that circumvents the formal structure of a conference committee, the Times reported.

Meanwhile, House immigration hawks are working on an alternative to Boehner’s proposal, Breitbart reported. 

On Thursday, aides to House conservatives who oppose the leadership’s plan gathered in the office of Sen. Jeff Sessions, Republican of Alabama and a fierce opponent of the immigration push, to plot a strategy to torpedo it.

Rep. Raúl R. Labrador, a Republican of Idaho and once a leading immigration negotiator in the House, told the Times it would be a mistake to push forward.

“The president has shown he’s not willing to work with us on immigration,” Labrador said. “It’s not worth having a party divided when we have so many issues we can come together on.”

Still, many Republicans — especially governors like Snyder — are thought to favor an rapid, comprehensive overhaul of the system.

“We need comprehensive immigration reform. To be blunt, we have a dumb system,” said Snyder, who described efforts in Michigan to grant visas to immigrants for work. He said it would “turbo-charge” the economy in places like Detroit.

Gutierrez said that without immigration overhaul, “our workforce down the road doesn’t grow,” and argued that there was increasing recognition within the GOP that it must be the party of immigration.

Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., the No. 3 leader in the House, expressed support this week for legalization for many of the immigrants here illegally while Democrats have pressed for a path to citizenship.

An unusual coalition of business, labor and evangelicals has lobbied hard for immigration legislation. Thomas Donohue, president of the Chamber of Commerce, has said immigration overhaul is a top priority this year. Donohue met with Boehner last week.

The issue is also crucial to several House Republicans whose districts have seen an increase in Hispanics and who are concerned about their re-election chances.

Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., who met with Boehner earlier this month, said the speaker is “very committed to getting it done and getting it done this year. He quoted Boehner as saying, “There’s no good time to do it, so let’s just get it done now.'”

Latest: Do You Support Giving Illegals Citizenship? Vote Here Now

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States Buck Public Opinion, Offer Driver’s Licenses to Illegals.


Nevada has become the latest state to allow illegal immigrants to obtain a driver’s license — even as public opinion polls show that the great majority of Americans oppose such measures.
A national poll conducted in October by Rasmussen Reports found that 68 percent of likely U.S. voters think illegal immigrants should not be allowed to obtain state driver’s licenses. Just 22 percent favor licenses for illegals in their state.
Critics say the laws encourage illegal immigration by legitimizing the status of those who come to the United States illegally.

“It is a kind of amnesty. It doesn’t given them any legal status, but by giving them a government-issued ID, it helps them imbed in society,” Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies in Washington, D.C.,  said in an interview with Newsmax.

“This is a way of protecting illegals from coming to the attention of immigration authorities,” Krikorian said. “It’s a way of documenting the undocumented.”
In Nevada, Democratic-led lawmakers approved a driver’s license law in 2013. It was signed by Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval, the state’s first Hispanic governor, who considers it a public safety measure, and went into effect at the beginning of this month.

“Allowing undocumented immigrants to obtain a driver’s privilege card will increase the number of drivers on Nevada’s roads that are insured and aware of traffic rules and regulations,” Sandoval said in a statement after signing the bill.

When Nevada began issuing licenses on Jan. 2, long lines formed at the Department of Motor Vehicles in Las Vegas, waiting for the 8 a.m. opening of the office. The Associated Press reported that “thousands of Nevada immigrants” sought to obtain licenses on the first day.

Those applying for the driving privilege cards must show some proof of their identity as well as evidence of Nevada residency and insurance. New drivers must pass a driving test, and pay to retake the test if they fail.

The information provided for the licenses, however, may not be used against them for purposes of enforcing immigration laws, a key provision in a state like Nevada where about a fourth of all residents are Latino.

Other states that have approved similar laws include Utah, Washington, Maryland, Oregon, Connecticut, California, New Mexico, and Illinois, along with the District of Columbia.
Said California’s Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown, in signing his state’s law last year: “No longer are undocumented people in the shadows. They are alive and well and respected in the State of California.”

The climate of permissiveness licenses for illegals follows a crackdown period after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacksthat came in response to widespread fears of foreign-born terrorists entering the country.

“After 9-11, things were tightening up. Now those states that are mainly run by Democrats are backtracking,” said Krikorian, noting that Congress has given leeway through the REAL ID law to states to issue immigrant driver’s cards, but those cannot be used for federal identification purposes like boarding planes.
New Mexico, with the nation’s largest Hispanic population, is one state attempting to buck the trend. Republican Gov. Susana Martinez is hoping to convince the Democratic-led state legislature to repeal the state’s current law, which offers licenses to illegals.She has tried before and failed, but vows to continue.
Polling shows that Martinez has support for her position, said Brian Sanderoff, president of Research & Polling Inc., a New Mexico firm that has polled for the Albuquerque Journal twice on the issue.

“Both times, the polls that we did for the Journal showed approximately 70 percent of registered voters opposed granting licenses to undocumented workers,” Sanderoff told Newsmax.

“I think it’s a significant issue to the extent that the governor is once again latching onto it,” he said.

New Mexico differs from its heavily Hispanic neighbor Arizona, where its governor, Republican Jan Brewer, has taken an aggressive stance against illegals in her state. In New Mexico, most Hispanic residents are natives, tracing their lineage back to Spain, said Sanderoff.

“Most New Mexicans are Americans, born and raised here, more so than the average state,” he said, which likely explains why voters there oppose the law by a wide margin.

The trend could continue as Congress renews its debate on immigration reform this year and proponents continue to push for the measure in more states.

“The push for it is nationally coordinated,” Krikorian said. “There is a broader push by national groups to have more say in the issue. They see it in two ways. First, as a practical matter, it helps to imbed the illegal immigrants in the U.S., making it less likely they will leave. Also, it will be presented as evidence of nationwide momentum for immigration ‘reform.'”

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© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.
By Andrea Billups

US Illegal Immigrant Deportations Fall to 1% in 2013.


Image: US Illegal Immigrant Deportations Fall to 1% in 2013An activist protesting deportations blocks the front gate of a building that houses federal immigration authorities in Atlanta on Nov. 19.

By Courtney Coren

Just 1 percent of  illegal immigrants living in the United States last year were deported  — a dramatic 25 percent drop from the previous year — a change the Obama Administration says is on purpose due to a shift in focus.

The administration cites putting more focus on border security, those that have just recently crossed and illegal immigrants with steep criminal records as opposed to those who are living in the United States peacefully.

As a result, in fiscal 2013 ended Sept. 30, only 133,551 illegal immigrants living in the country were deported by U.S. Immigration and Customs EnforcementThe Washington Times reported.

“Increasing border security is a top priority, and the results you see today clearly illustrate our ongoing commitment to this goal,” said John Sandweg, the acting director of ICE.

There also has been a 10 percent drop in deportations when border and interior deportations are combined. In 2013, a total of 368,644 interior and border illegal immigrants were deported, compared with almost 410,000 in 2012.

It is the lowest number of deportations since President Barack Obama took office.

However, neither side of the immigration debate is happy with these numbers.

Immigration rights advocates say that over 2 million illegal immigrants have been deported since Obama became president — many of which they allege were inhumane since many of those deported are parents of young children.

“How much longer do we have to stand by and watch our families get torn apart by unscrupulous immigration agents?” asked Eddie Carmona of the Campaign for Citizenship.

Activists take issue with Sandweg’s claim that a large majority of those deported were criminals.

Pablo Alvarado of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network said that “this White House has practically made sneezing a criminal act for immigrants.”

Those who want more enforcement of immigration laws question why the deportations are so low since Homeland Security actually had a 10 percent increase in its deportation budget last year.

Sandweg said that not all illegal immigrants are from Mexico, and they are expensive to deport.

“This information further reveals that the administration has been manipulating its figures to mislead the public,” said Stephen Miller, spokesman for Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala. “The administration’s catch-and-release policy not only needlessly jeopardizes public safety but undermines the wages and employment of struggling workers.”

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© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Deportations Plunge as Obama Immigration Law Push Stalls.


Image: Deportations Plunge as Obama Immigration Law Push Stalls

Protesters rally at an immigrant detention center in Elizabeth, New Jersey on Dec. 10.

The Obama administration has cut back on deporting undocumented immigrants, with forced departures on track to drop more than 10 percent from last year, the first annual decline in more than a decade.

In his first term, President Barack Obama highlighted record deportations to show he was getting tough on immigration enforcement, which Republicans and even some Democrats have demanded as a condition for overhauling existing laws.

The last fiscal year was different. The U.S. deported 343,020 people in the U.S. illegally from Oct. 1, 2012, to Sept. 7, 2013, the most recent Immigration and Customs Enforcement data show. If that pace continued through the Sept. 30 end of the fiscal year, removals would reach a six-year low.

The drop, which comes as Obama faces growing criticism from Hispanics over deportations, is a result of a new policy of focusing limited enforcement resources “on public safety, national security and border security,” ICE spokeswoman Barbara Gonzalez said. “ICE has been vocal about the shift in our immigration-enforcement strategy,” she said. “Our removal numbers illustrate this.”

Legislation to revamp the U.S. immigration system is stalled because of resistance from Republicans in the House of Representatives. Republican lawmakers opposed to changes backed by both Obama and former President George W. Bush, including offering a path to citizenship to the country’s estimated 12 million undocumented immigrants, have demanded tougher enforcement before considering new legislation.

Pushing Back

Yet as deportations climbed to a record 409,900 last year, Obama has faced pushback from the Democratic Party’s Hispanic backers, who helped provide his victory margin in two elections. There have also been protests from immigration activists, most recently at a speech he gave last month in San Francisco.

“He’s going to continue to be confronted,” Representative Luis Gutierrez said of Obama, a fellow Illinois Democrat. “You can’t say you’re going to protect the undocumented and give them a pathway to citizenship, and then deport them in unprecedented numbers.”

Even with the decline this year, about 1.93 million people have been deported during Obama’s five years in office. That approaches Bush’s eight-year total and is almost as many as in the 108 years between the administrations of Presidents Benjamin Harrison, when Department of Homeland Security records begin, and Bill Clinton.

Contractors Benefit

What’s more, a decline in deportations doesn’t necessarily mean fewer people will be locked up.

In 2009, a Democratic-controlled Congress set a minimum on how many undocumented immigrants should be detained each day pending hearings. It’s now 34,000, up from about 20,000 in 2005.

Even a broad immigration bill approved by the Senate this year — which creates a road to citizenship for undocumented workers — would “increase the prison population by about 14,000 inmates annually by 2018” due to more spending on enforcement, a congressional cost-estimate projected.

That may have a positive effect on companies that the government increasingly relies on to detain those being held for deportation hearings, if it becomes law, said Kevin Campbell, who tracks private prison companies for Avondale Partners, a Nashville-based financial-services company.

“You think about immigration reform and you intuitively think that means less people prosecuted for immigration offenses, but it seems like it will be just the opposite,” Campbell said.

The surge in deportations has benefited companies such as Boca Raton, Florida-based GEO Group Inc., which runs prisons in five countries. ICE accounted for 17 percent of the company’s $1.48 billion in revenue last year, up from 11 percent of $1.04 billion in revenue in 2008, according to company filings.

Policy Changes

Campbell and ICE officials said the drop in deportations stems from changes the administration started making in 2011.

In a departure from Bush’s policies, which emphasized raids on businesses suspected of hiring undocumented immigrants, then- ICE Director John Morton said deportations should focus on “national security, public safety and border security.”

Morton discouraged agents from detaining young immigrants, crime victims and “individuals pursuing legitimate civil rights complaints.”

This “prosecutorial discretion” accounted for 16,300 immigration court cases being closed in 2013, according to data compiled for Bloomberg by Syracuse University’s Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse. That’s up from 9,700 last year.

About 58 percent of deportations in 2013 were of “criminals,” ICE data show. In 2008, it was 31 percent.

More Exemptions

The list of exemptions has continued to grow.

In June 2012, five months before his re-election, Obama exempted from deportation certain undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children, known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Last month, the Department of Homeland Security halted deportations for families of U.S. military members because of the “stress and anxiety” that possible forced removals puts on those in the Armed Services.

The change has provoked administration critics.

“These are policies that severely restrict ICE agents from arresting and charging illegal aliens,” said Jessica Vaughn, policy director at the Center for Immigration Studies in Washington, which opposes increased immigration.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, a Virginia Republican, said during a Dec. 3 hearing that the changes “push executive power beyond all limits.”

“President Obama is the first president since Richard Nixon to ignore a duly enacted law simply because he disagrees with it,” he said.

‘Prosecutorial Discretion’

The president isn’t ignoring the law, White House press secretary Jay Carney said yesterday.

“We have to enforce the law,” he said. “There is prosecutorial discretion, and that is applied. The focus is on those who’ve committed felonies.”

That approach, he said, is “not a replacement for comprehensive immigration reform.”

Advocates for the Senate bill want Obama to do more. This month, 29 House Democrats, including Gutierrez, signed a letter calling on Obama to suspend deportations.

That has backing from the AFL-CIO. The federation of labor unions with 13 million members spent at least $6.4 million supporting Obama in his 2012 re-election campaign, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

“The president has the authority and the ability to ease this crisis,” said Ana Avendano, director of immigration and community action at the AFL-CIO.

Facing Protests

Obama was interrupted at an immigration rally on Nov. 25 in San Francisco when Ju Hong, a college student standing on the riser behind him, yelled that the president has “power to stop deportations for all.”

“Actually, I don’t,” Obama replied. “If, in fact, I could solve all these problems without passing laws in Congress, then I would do so. But we’re also a nation of laws.”

The bill that the Senate passed in June with bipartisan support has stalled in the House, where Republican Speaker John Boehner said on Nov. 13 that he has “no intention” of considering it.

That doesn’t mean attempts to change the law are dead. Boehner said he prefers passing parts of the legislation separately, and Obama has said he’s willing to support that approach.

New Hire

Boehner this month hired Rebecca Tallent, who as the Bipartisan Policy Center’s director of immigration policy helped on immigration bills as a staff member for Senator John McCain and former Representative Jim Kolbe. The two Republicans supported easing immigration laws.

With an average of about 1,000 deportations a day this year, that means more than 165,000 immigrants have been removed from the country since the Senate bill passed.

“We just want the chance to be able to work,” said Rebeca Nolasco, a 21-year-old who received deferred action and whose mother, Diana Ramos, is in an Arizona detention center facing deportation. “It doesn’t harm anyone.”
© Copyright 2013 Bloomberg News. All rights reserved.

Source: Newsmax.com

Obama Amnesty Program for Young Illegals Finds Few Enrollees.


More than a year after the Obama administration implemented a program to let young illegal immigrants stay in the country for at least two years, it is still encountering troubles with enrollment.

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which started in August 2012, prevents many undocumented immigrants between the ages of 15 and 32 from being deported and allows them to work legally for two years, after which they can renew their status.

But the number of applications has significantly dwindled in recent months—only about half of the 1.1 million who could be eligible have applied—even in states with high immigrant populations, reports The New York Times.

While 74 percent of those eligible in North Carolina and 63 percent of those eligible in Georgia had signed up, the rate was 34 percent in New York and 35 percent in Florida, according to the newspaper.

A study published by the Migration Policy Institute in August found that the participation rate also varies by nationality; it was 66 percent among Mexicans, 59 percent among Hondurans and 55 percent among Brazilians, but only 16 percent among Filipinos, 14 percent among Dominicans and less than 9 percent among Chinese.

Analysts have attributed some of the regional differences to factors such as the enforcement of immigration laws and access to public transportation.

Applicants must also meet certain conditions, including proof they are enrolled in school, have a high school diploma or the equivalent, or have been honorably discharged from the military.

One of the strongest attempts to find those who are eligible is being made in New York City, where a coalition of immigrant advocacy groups, with $18 million in funding from the City Council, has launched a major outreach effort.

“This came about because we were all disappointed with the uptake,” Jeanne Mullgrav, commissioner for the Department of Youth and Community Services, which is overseeing the project, told the Times.

Those who are on the ground have their work cut out for them. It is like “chipping away at the ice,” said Susan Pan, a legal fellow at Atlas: DIY, an advocacy group, adding, “Trust is extremely critical.”

But experts have also identified several other potential obstacles, including questions about what paperwork can be used to apply and a lack of resources for local organizations serving immigrants who don’t speak English or Spanish, reports the Associated Press. 

There are also questions about the efficacy of the application process itself. “In California, school systems were overloaded with transcript requests. People wanted copies of their leases from landlords, of their health records. Every part of society was triggered,” Marielena Hincapie, head of the National Immigration Law Center, told the AP.

Although House Speaker John Boehner has said the lower chamber will not take up a comprehensive immigration bill this year, if Congress does address the question of a path to citizenship for the 11 million people already living in the country illegally, the deferred action program could offer some lessons.

“Getting a glimpse into the future is pretty daunting,” Michael Petrucelli, a former acting director at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, told the AP.

“It’s a great reason to look at whether you have effective processes in place now,” he added.

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By Lisa Barron

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