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Posts tagged ‘Jan Brewer’

Coalition of African American Pastors Wants Holder Impeached.


Image: Coalition of African American Pastors Wants Holder Impeached

By Greg Richter

A group of black pastors is seeking the impeachment of Attorney General Eric Holder over his calling for state attorneys general to ignore state laws that ban same-sex marriage.

“America is not where we have a king that gives orders from on high. But they use the influence of their office to change America,” the Rev. William Owens, president of the Coalition of African American Pastors, said of Holder and President Barack Obama in an appearance Wednesday on Fox News Channel’s “Hannity.”

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Owens referred to the president and attorney general as “King Obama and King Holder,”  saying they have gone against the will of the people who have voted to ban same-sex marriage in their states.

Obama, he said, was deceptive when he said in his first run for president in 2008 that he believed marriage was between a man and woman. He later said his thinking had “evolved” on the issue.

“He did that to get elected first, and the deal he made with the gay community was, when I get elected on my second go-round I will fight for it. But he did not evolve. He was already there,” Owens said.

Owens accused Obama of purposely lying.

“He said if you want you can keep your doctor. It’s a pattern for them to get what they want over the will of the people,” he said.

Holder has said the administration’s efforts on gay rights are building on the civil rights movement, but Owens said his group parts ways with the White House on that issue.

“I was in the civil rights movement. We didn’t fight for anything like this,” he said. “In fact, they don’t want equal rights, they want superior rights. They want special rights. They have always had the right to do what they want to do.”

Owens said gay rights are being used to trample on religious rights, pointing to pressure put on Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer to veto a bill granting religious exemptions to businesses such as wedding photographers who have moral objections to gay marriage. Brewer vetoed the bill Wednesday.

“What about what we believe?” Owens asked.

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Dick Morris: NFL, Flake Forced Brewer’s Hand.


Image: Dick Morris: NFL, Flake Forced Brewer's HandArizona Gov. Jan Brewer and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell during a Super Bowl host committee handover ceremony in New York.

By Todd Beamon

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer vetoed a religious protection bill concerning gay rights because she was pressured by the state’s business community and the National Football League, which is scheduled to hold the Super Bowl in the state next year, political analyst Dick Morris told Newsmax late Wednesday.

“I think she vetoed the bill because of pressure from the Arizona business community,” Morris, who served as an aide to President Bill Clinton, told Newsmax in an email. “When Sen. Jeff Flake, a tea party conservative from Arizona, joined his colleague John McCain in urging a veto, it gave her political cover on the right to veto the bill,” Morris said.

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“I think the [National Football League] had a lot to do with it also,” he said. “By threatening to move the Super Bowl, they epitomized the harm that would flow to Arizona had she signed the bill.

“I don’t think she realistically had any choice. It became a jobs issue — and she had to veto the bill.”

In vetoing the legislation, Brewer said the controversial measure could “create more problems than it purports to solve.”

State Senate Bill 1062 would have allowed business owners to cite their religious beliefs as legal grounds for refusing to serve same-sex couples or any other prospective customer. It was passed by the Republican-controlled Arizona Legislature last week.

“Senate Bill 1062 does not address a specific or present concern related to religious liberty in Arizona,” Brewer said in a brief statement from her office as she announced her decision. “I have not heard one example in Arizona where a business owner’s religious liberty has been violated.”

She then attacked the bill as a broadly worded proposal that “could result in unintended and negative consequences.”

Brewer had come under mounting pressure to veto the measure after both McCain and Flake, both Republicans, opposed it. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, the 2012 GOP presidential candidate, also spoke against the bill.

Three state Republicans who voted for the bill last week also reversed course and urged Brewer to veto it.

“I appreciate the decision made by Gov. Brewer to veto this legislation,” McCain said in a statement posted on his website. “I hope that we can now move on from this controversy and assure the American people that everyone is welcome to live, work and enjoy our beautiful State of Arizona.”

Flake said on Twitter:

He added in a later post:

The legislation was backed by the Center for Arizona Policy, a socially conservative group that opposes abortion and gay marriage.

Cathi Herrod, the group’s president, said Brewer’s veto marked “a sad day for Arizonans who cherish and understand religious liberty.”

The bill, she said, “passed the legislature for one reason only: to guarantee that all Arizonans would be free to live and work according to their faith.”

“Opponents were desperate to distort this bill rather than debate the merits,” Herrod said. “Essentially, they succeeded in getting a veto of a bill that does not even exist.”

Perhaps the strongest opposition to the legislation came from business leaders. Some who had opposed it threatened to boycott Arizona if Brewer approved it, similar to what many groups did after the state passed a tough anti-illegal immigration law in 2010.

That possibility worried some companies and business organizations, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Among the companies opposing the bill were Apple, American Airlines, Marriott International, and Delta Air Lines.

The Arizona Super Bowl Committee also voiced its opposition to the bill, contending that it would “deal a significant blow” to the state’s economy, the Times reports.

The 2015 Super Bowl is scheduled to be played at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, just outside Phoenix.

In addition, the Hispanic National Bar Association said on Wednesday that it would move its 40th annual convention, scheduled for September 2015 in Phoenix, to another city because of the legislation, the Times reported.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Ted Haggard: Brewer Right to Veto Bill.


Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer was right to veto a bill Wednesday that would have allowed business people to refuse service to gay couples, says an evangelical leader who was once caught up in a sex scandal with another man.

Ted Haggard told CNN after Brewer’s announcement that Christians, like everyone else, need to respect others.

“That was a broadly worded bill that had unintended consequences hidden in it that would have developed over the years,” Haggard told CNN’s Erin Burnett.

Haggard was a mega-church pastor and president of the National Association of Evangelicals in 2006 when it was revealed that he had had a long-term sexual relationship with a male escort. Haggard was preaching and working against gay marriage when the allegations came to light.

Haggard told Burnett on Wednesday that it is “bigotry” for Christians to refuse to serve others based on a moral code.

“We as Christians are here to wash the feet of others and make life better, not to make life worse,” he said.

Peter Sprigg of the Family Research Council disagreed. Sprigg told Burnett that current Arizona law doesn’t list gays as a protected class, so the new law would have given them added protections.

Sprigg said the battle won’t be over until the U.S. Supreme Court rules. It will take “a Roe v. Wade of same-sex marriage” before the fight will be over, he said.

Haggard responded, “There will be a Supreme Court decision that will make equality the law of the land.”

Cathi Herrod, president of the Center for Arizona Policy, a socially conservative group that opposes abortion and gay marriage and pushed the legislation, said Brewer’s veto marked “a sad day for Arizonans who cherish and understand religious liberty.”

The bill, she said in a statement, “passed the legislature for one reason only: to guarantee that all Arizonans would be free to live and work according to their faith.”

“Opponents were desperate to distort this bill rather than debate the merits,” Herrod said. “Essentially, they succeeded in getting a veto of a bill that does not even exist.”

Log Cabin Republicans Executive Director Gregory T. Angelo, appearing on MSNBC,  said the veto of SB1062 showed the will of the majority of Republicans to grant equality to same-sex couples.

Angelo’s group fights for gay rights within the GOP, and he said that even though it was Republicans who passed the bill, he was encouraged that it was vetoed by a Republican and that many powerful members of the party opposed it.

“I appreciate the decision made by Gov. Brewer to veto this legislation,” Republican Sen. John McCain said. “I hope that we can now move on from this controversy and as sure the American people that everyone is welcome to live, work and enjoy our beautiful state of Arizona.”
McCain’s colleague, Sen. Jeff Flake, thanked Brewer for her veto on Twitter:

Flake said in a later tweet:

Both senators had urged Brewer to veto the legislation.

Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, said the pressure on Brewer from big businesses and professional sports leagues is an example of how fundamental freedoms are being trampled.

“You create a stampede by spooking politicians and the public with misinformation,” Perkins said on Fox News Channel’s “The Kelly File.”

“This is going to continue to be a major problem, and it’s going to spread across the country,” Perkins said. “It’s now going to be incumbent upon Gov. Brewer to say how she’s going to protect the religious freedom of thousands of Arizonians.”

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© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.
By Greg Richter

Arizona Gov. Brewer Mulls Signing Religious Protection Act.


Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer says she will closely review a bill that would let business owners cite their religious beliefs as legal justification for refusing service to same-sex couples and others.

The legislation was approved Thursday with overwhelming Republican support, reports The Arizona Republic.

Brewer, a Republican, told CNN Friday she will review the bill carefully, but didn’t reveal her opinion of the legislation.

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“I think anybody that owns a business can choose who they work with or who they don’t work with,” Brewer commented to CNN in Washington, DC, where she is attending a governors’ conference. “But I don’t know that it needs to be statutory. In my life and in my businesses, if I don’t want to do business or if I don’t want to deal with a particular company or person or whatever, I’m not interested. That’s America. That’s freedom.”

The governor’s advisers said she will meet with lawmakers, the business community, and others as she weighs whether to sign the bill, which gay rights activists say will legally permit discrimination.

“In this instance, you have a bill that had a party-line vote,” an unnamed adviser told The Republic. “It puts her in a difficult spot.”

Story continues below video.

Brewer does not plan to return to Arizona until Tuesday, but people on both sides of the issue took to Twitter  to push her to act.

Social conservatives call the bill a matter of religious freedom, reports the Republic, and are urging Brewer to sign the bill so people and businesses will not be forced to act against their religious beliefs and offer services to homosexuals or others with whom they disagree.

“In America, people should be free to live and work according to their faith, and the government shouldn’t be able to tell us we can’t do that,” Joseph E. La Rue, the legal counsel at Scottsdale-based religious-liberty group Alliance Defending Freedom, told The New York Times. “Faith shouldn’t be something we have to leave inside our house.”

LaRue’s group and the Center for Arizona Policy, described as one of the state legislature’s top lobbies, drafted the bill.

Some Arizona business leaders voiced strong opposition to the religious freedom bill, as did most of the candidates to replace Brewer in the November election, reports The Arizona Capitol Times.

Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, and James Lundy, who chairs the organization’s board of directors, sent a letter to Brewer Friday begging her to veto the bill, saying it would have “profound, negative effects on our business community for years to come,” reports the Capitol Times.

They praised Brewer for the work she and the Arizona Commerce Authority have done strengthening the state’s economy, but said the controversial bill will represent a setback.

The council also warned that the bill could cause problems by alienating businesses looking to relocate and hurt tourism as the state readies for next year’s Super Bowl.

Brewer is religious and typically follows the party vote on social issues like abortion and gay marriage, but few people are speculating how she’ll decide on the new legislation.

But even if she follows the party on the bill, she may face repercussions from some Republicans who have been against her since she expanded Medicaid last year.

Arizona is the first state to pass a broad right-to-refuse-service bill, but Brewer in 2001 rejected similar legislation, State Bill 1070, which would have barred the state from taking action against a person’s professional license based on religion. That bill was also passed along Republican party lines.

If Brewer neither signs or vetoes the bill, it will still become law without her signature. But she has only once allowed a bill to go through without signing it, so watchers expect her to act.

But Republican consultant Chris Baker denied Brewer is in a politically precarious position.
“She is a lame duck for all intents and purposes, and unlike (SB) 1070, which really was for her a political decision, she’s not under that type of pressure,” Baker said. “For the most part, she’s free to do what she thinks is in the state’s best interest.”

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By Sandy Fitzgerald

Jan Brewer Mocks Obama Border Security Claim.


Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer isn’t buying President Barack Obama’s claim that the U.S. border with Mexico is more secure than ever.

Attending the National Governors Association meeting in Milwaukee, Brewer told Politico, “It’s Jay Leno comedy every other week.” Obama plans visits both to Arizona and Leno’s “Tonight Show” this coming week.

Brewer told Politico the Yuma border is “pretty secure,” but “Tucson is a nightmare.”

Brewer said no one knows how many people are crossing the border or who they are.

“Everybody that you talk to has different numbers: Border Patrol … Homeland Security … the sheriffs,” she said. “It’s the drug cartels that we live with … the drop houses, the extortion, the sex-slavery industry, the gangs fighting one another.”

Brewer says she doesn’t want an immigration bill that includes amnesty to pass. On Saturday, she called on Congress to pass a stand-alone border security bill.

“We’re not going to live through 1986 once again, where President Reagan – my hero – gave amnesty and said our borders would be secured and it didn’t take,” Brewer said.

There is a combative history between Brewer and Obama. The federal government sued Arizona in 2010 for passing its own immigration laws after Brewer denounced the federal government for failing to enforce federal laws. Then Arizona sued the federal government in 2011 for failing to enforce those laws.

In 2012, Brewer met Obama at an airport tarmac and stuck out her finger during a testy exchange after he criticized her description of an Oval Office meeting between the two in her book.

© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

By Greg Richter

Ariz. GOP Split Over Brewer’s Medicaid Expansion.


When Republican Gov. Jan Brewer managed to pass Medicaid expansion in the state with Democrats and a few Republicans in June, she probably didn’t realize what a hornet’s nest she’d stir up.

Conservative Republicans were furious and have vowed not only to repeal the law, but also launch primary campaigns against the Republicans who supported her.

“It’s pro-life, it’s saving lives, it is creating jobs, it is saving hospitals,” Brewer told The New York Times. “I don’t know how you can get any more conservative than that.”

But the GOP-led legislature doesn’t see it that way, and neither do a lot of Republican activists. The conservative blog Sonoran Alliance dubbed Republicans who voted for the expansion “Brewercrats” and the expansion “Obrewercare.”

A petition drive to give voters a chance to undo the expansion has eight more weeks to gather the needed 86,400 signatures. Brewer is also mounting a petition drive in favor of the expansion.

“(Brewer) abandoned the planks of the Republican Party platform to do whatever she perceived to be popular, and she grossly miscalculated the power we had to fight back,” Frank Antenori, a former Republican state senator who is backing the repeal effort, told the Times.

Brewer, who has fought President Barack Obama on issues such as states’ rights to enforce federal immigration laws, believes the two sides can reconcile.

“Nobody likes to lose, and that’s what happened” when the Medicare expansion passed, she told the Times. “I believe we will heal.”

© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

By Greg Richter

Mexican Officials Upset Over US Border Security Plan.


Officials in Mexico are upset by plans by the United States to spend tens of billions of dollars for additional fencing and other security along the U.S.-Mexico border.

“Mexico is convinced that our public policies should be coordinated and should recognize the importance of the border for competitiveness, job creation, and the social well-being of both countries,” Mexican Foreign Minister Jose Antonio Meade said.

“We are convinced that fences don’t unite. They are not the solution to the immigration phenomenon and they don’t jibe with a modern and secure border,” said the foreign minister. “They don’t contribute to the development of the competitive region that both countries seek to promote.”

Last week, a Senate committee earmarked $46 billion to double the U.S. Border Patrol and to build 700 more miles of anti-immigrant fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border, reports GlobalPost.com.

The influx of Mexican immigrants has plummeted in recent years with new fencing and the U.S. economic downturn. The U.S. Border Patrol detained about 1.6 million undocumented immigrants in 2000 and just over 260,000 last year, the website says.

Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin said on Tuesday that the Senate’s border security amendment should help immigration reform pass in the House.

Gov. Jan Brewer of Arizona — known for her own tough immigration policies — also praised the border surge amendment, claiming it as a “victory” for her state.

© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

By Bill Hoffmann

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