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Posts tagged ‘Lech Wałęsa’

Lech Walesa: Obama Has Failed, ‘America no Longer Leads the World’.


Image: Lech Walesa: Obama Has Failed, 'America no Longer Leads the World'

By Cathy Burke

The Nobel Peace Prize-winning former president of Poland, Lech Walesa, says President Obama has failed to reclaim America’s role as a world leader.

In an interview with CNN aired Wednesday, the 70-year-old Walesa — who supported Republican Mitt Romney in the 2012 election — said the Obama administration has been a dangerous disappointment.

“When he was elected… there was great hope,” Walesa said. “…. we were hoping Obama would reclaim moral leadership for America,” adding: “That failed.”

“…. in terms of politics and morality, America no longer leads the world,” he said. “…America did not regain its leadership status. We were just lucky there were no big conflicts in the world,” saying the world has relied on a strong America to maintain the balance of power around the globe.

“… It’s a dangerous situation so we are awaiting a president who will understand that,” he said.

Walesa went from a shipyard electrician to a union leader who helped overthrow the communist government in Poland, winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 1983, and seven years later, becoming the first democratically elected president in Poland.

“I managed to destroy a bad system,” he told CNN in the interview in Washington. “…. now we must be excellent at building new things. It doesn’t take that much.”

In 2012, Walesa effectively endorsed Romney in his bid for president.

“I wish you to be successful because this success is needed to the United States, of course, but to Europe and the rest of the world, too,” Walesa was heard after meeting Romney in Poland, the Weekly Standard reported at the time.

“Gov. Romney, get your success — be successful!”

Walesa is the subject of a documentary that will be considered for an Academy Award this year, “Walesa, Man of Hope.”

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© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Nobel Peace Prize Summit To Discuss Creating A One World Religion.


AFP – Polish Nobel peace laureate Lech Walesa on Monday called for a new “secular Ten Commandments” to underpin universal values, addressing a summit of Nobel Peace Prize winners in Warsaw.

one-world-religion-mental-illness

“We need to agree on common values for all religions as soon as possible, a kind of secular Ten Commandments on which we will build the world of tomorrow,” he said in an opening speech kicking off the three-day summit.

Walesa won the Nobel 30 years ago for leading Poland’s Solidarity trade union, which negotiated a peaceful end to communism in Poland in 1989.

Besides universal values, the international community nee.

ds to focus on the economy of tomorrow, he said.

“That’s definitely neither communism nor capitalism as we have it today,” said the former shipyard electrician, who became Poland’s first post-war democratic president.

The Dalai Lama, Iranian human rights advocate and 2003 Nobel winner Shirin Ebadi and Ireland’s 1976 laureate Betty Williams are taking part in the summit. Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, who launched the summits in 2000, said he could not attend.

Hollywood star Sharon Stone is to receive the gathering’s Peace Summit Award for her anti-AIDS campaigning. The first eight summits were held in Rome. Since 2008, they have taken place in Berlin, Paris, Hiroshima and Chicago. source – France 24.

by NTEB News Desk

Walesa Wants New Secular ‘Ten Commandments’.


Polish Nobel peace laureate Lech Walesa on Monday called for a new “secular Ten Commandments” to underpin universal values, addressing a summit of Nobel Peace Prize winners in Warsaw.

“We need to agree on common values for all religions as soon as possible, a kind of secular Ten Commandments on which we will build the world of tomorrow,” he said in an opening speech kicking off the three-day summit.

Walesa won the Nobel 30 years ago for leading Poland‘s Solidarity trade union, which negotiated a peaceful end to communism in Poland in 1989.

Besides universal values, the international community needs to focus on the economy of tomorrow, he said.

“That’s definitely neither communism nor capitalism as we have it today,” said the former shipyard electrician, who became Poland’s first post-war democratic president.

The Dalai Lama, Iranian human rights advocate and 2003 Nobel winner Shirin Ebadi and Ireland’s 1976 laureate Betty Williams are taking part in the summit. Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, who launched the summits in 2000, said he could not attend.

Hollywood star Sharon Stone is to receive the gathering’s Peace Summit Award for her anti-AIDS campaigning.

The first eight summits were held in Rome. Since 2008, they have taken place in Berlin, Paris, Hiroshima and Chicago.

 

© AFP 2013

Source: NEWSmax.com

Lech Walesa shocks Poland with anti-gay words.


 

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  • FILE - In this Sept. 30, 2003 file photo Lech Walesa, Poland's Solidarity leader and former president, gets a kiss from his wife Danuta, during a birthday party in Gdansk, Poland. Walesa, the democracy icon and Nobel peace prize winner, has sparked controversy and outrage in Poland by saying in a TV interview Friday, March 1, 2013, homosexuals have no right to a prominent role in politics and that as a minority they need to "adjust to smaller things" in society. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski, File)View PhotoFILE – In this Sept. 30, 2003 file …

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Lech Walesa, the Polish democracy icon and Nobel peace prize winner, has sparked outrage in Poland by saying that gays have no right to a prominent role in politics and that as a minority they need to “adjust to smaller things.”

Some commentators are now suggesting that Walesa, the leading figure in Poland’s successful democracy struggle against communism, has irreparably harmed his legacy.

Walesa said in a television interview on Friday that he believes gays have no right to sit on the front benches in Parliament and, if represented at all, should sit in the back, “and even behind a wall.”

“They have to know that they are a minority and must adjust to smaller things. And not rise to the greatest heights, the greatest hours, the greatest provocations, spoiling things for the others and taking (what they want) from the majority,” he told the private broadcaster TVN during a discussion of gay rights. “I don’t agree to this and I will never agree to it.”

“A minority should not impose itself on the majority,” Walesa said.

The words have enraged many.

“From a human point of view his language was appalling. It was the statement of a troglodyte,” said Jerzy Wenderlich, a deputy speaker of Parliament with the Democratic Left Alliance.

In some ways the uproar says as much about Poland today as it does about Walesa.

Walesa, Poland’s first democratic-era president, is a deeply conservative Roman Catholic and a father of eight. But, the democracy he helped create in 1989 from the turmoil of strikes and other protests has had a profound social transformation in recent years.

Poland is a traditionally conservative and Catholic society that long suppressed discussions of gay rights. The topic was essentially taboo under communism, and in the early years of democracy. The Polish church, which has a strong role in political life, still holds that homosexuality is deviant, while gays and lesbians say they face discrimination and even violence.

However, much has changed. A watershed moment came in 2011 when a new progressive and anti-clerical party — Palikot’s Movement — entered Parliament for the first time. Taking seats for the party were Anna Grodzka, a transsexual, and Robert Biedron, who is openly gay. These were all historic firsts.

The two have been in the public eye while lawmakers have debated a civil partnership law. Though lawmakers have recently struck down proposals, the discussions continue. A new campaign was just launched to fight taboos.

Some predicted the consequences for Walesa could be serious.

A national committee devoted to fighting hate speech and other crimes filed a complaint with prosecutors on Sunday in Gdansk, Walesa’s home city, accusing him of promoting “propaganda of hate against a sexual minority.”

Walesa is no longer active in Polish political life, though he is often interviewed and asked his opinion on current affairs. Much of his time is spent giving lectures internationally on his role in fighting communism and on issues of peace and democracy.

“Now nobody in their right mind will invite Lech Walesa as a moral authority, knowing what he said,” Wenderlich said.

Monika Olejnik, a leading television journalist, said Walesa “disgraced the Nobel prize.”

Some, however, said they were not surprised by Walesa’s words.

“I am surprised that only now we are noticing that Walesa is not in control of what he says and that he has views that are far from being politically correct,” said Adam Bielan, a conservative Polish member of the European Parliament.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By VANESSA GERA | Associated Press

Lech Walesa effectively backs Romney.


Mitt Romney meets former Polish president Lech Walesa, Monday, July 30, 2012, in Artus Court, in Gdansk, Poland. …GDANSK, Poland–Lech Walesa, the Nobel Peace Prize winner and former president of Poland, effectively endorsed Mitt Romney during a meeting with the GOP presidential candidate Monday.

Walesa, a co-founder of the Solidarity movement in Poland which challenged Communist rule during the 1980s, urged Romney to “get your success” in the upcoming election.

“I wish you to be successful because this success is needed to the United States, of course, but to Europe and the rest of the world, too,” Walesa told Romney ahead of an hour-long meeting between the two men. “Romney, get your success! Be successful!”

It was Romney’s second meeting of the day in Gdansk, a brief stopover before the candidate heads to Warsaw, the final stop of his week-long overseas tour. Romney’s campaign noted the candidate visited Poland at Walesa’s invitation. It was a sly dig at President Barack Obama, whose diplomatic relationship with Polish officials has been strained since 2009, when the Obama administration canceled an air missile defense system set to be built in Poland. The move was viewed as a concession to Russia.

Earlier Monday, Romney met with Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk. Protestors rallied outside–including a group of people who chanted Obama’s name. Others waved a large sign in Polish in support of Ron Paul.
On his way out of town, Romney, his wife, Ann, and son Josh visited two prominent memorials in Gdansk. They laid a wreath at Westerplatte, where the first shots of World War II were fired. Before heading to the airport, they stopped at the Solidarity Monument, one of the most revered spots in Poland, which marks where the Solidarity movement began.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By Holly Bailey, Yahoo! News | The Ticket 

Polish Solidarity distances self from Romney visit.


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GDANSK, Poland (Reuters) – Solidarity, the trade union movement which led the Polish struggle against Communist rule, distanced itself on Monday from a visit to Poland by U.S. presidential candidate Mitt Romney, saying he supported attacks on unions in his own country.

              Romney was in Poland on the third and final leg of a foreign tour aimed at burnishing his foreign policy credentials and demonstrating that he would be a viable alternative to U.S. President Barack Obama on the world stage.

              Romney visited the Baltic port of Gdansk, cradle of Solidarity which toppled Poland’s Communist government in the late 1980s, where he met Lech Walesa, the shipyard electrician who led the union movement during that struggle.

              “Regretfully, we were informed by our friends from the American headquarters of (trade union federation) AFL-CIO, which represents more than 12 million employees … that Mitt Romney supported attacks on trade unions and employees’ rights,” Solidarity said in a statement.

              “Solidarity was not involved in organizing Romney’s meeting with Walesa and did not invite him to visit Poland.”

Romney is trying to avoid any further missteps after gaffes during the first leg of his tour, in Britain, generated negative newspaper headlines and criticism even from some of his own supporters. He came to Poland from Israel, his second stop.

In Gdansk, Romney, who has called Poland’s neighbor Russia the top “geopolitical foe” of the United States, tried to show that if elected president he would be a stronger ally to Moscow-wary Poland than Obama.

Hundreds of people were on hand to watch Romney and his wife, Ann, arrive at the Gdansk Old Town Hall for a meeting with Prime Minister Donald Tusk.

Romney and Tusk and their delegations talked for about 45 minutes, then Romney went to the building next door and met Walesa.

Walesa, who was Polish president for five years from 1990, effectively endorsed Romney in their meeting.

              “I wish you to be successful because this success is needed for the United States of course, but for Europe and the rest of the world too. Governor Romney, get your success. Be successful,” he said.

              Romney, a former governor of the U.S. state of Massachusetts, laughed heartily and thanked Walesa for inviting him.

Romney is to give a speech in the Polish capital, Warsaw, on Tuesday to conclude his week-long foreign tour.

“The relationship that our countries have is very important and it would be a high priority in a Romney administration,” said a senior Romney campaign adviser.

              However, it may prove difficult in Poland for Romney to draw a sharp contrast with his Democratic rival in the presidential election because Polish leaders enjoy fairly strong ties with the Obama White House.

              Walesa ended his association with the Solidarity movement several years ago following disputes over policy.

              Solidarity is still known abroad because of its historic role in the collapse of Communism and the fall of the Berlin Wall. At home, it is now closely linked with Poland’s biggest opposition party, which promotes conservative social values.

              (Additional reporting by Chris Borowski in Gdansk; Writing by Christian Lowe and Steve Holland; Editing by Tim Pearce)

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

ReutersBy Steve Holland | Reuters 

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