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Posts tagged ‘Preventive medicine’

Unforgiveness Can Create Chronic Pain.


Dr. Don Colbert
Dr. Don Colbert

I have often wondered, Why do we see much more rheumatoid arthritis occurring in women than in men? I began to pay close attention to the studies showing that men are usually able to express their anger, whereas women tend to hold it in and become depressed. I recalled the scripture, “A broken spirit drieth the bones” (Prov. 17:22, KJV).

Could it be that a “broken spirit” in some women is causing rheumatoid arthritis? Is it causing the joints and bones to be inflamed and weakened?

The person who continues to seethe over some unresolved issue is not only destroying a personal relationship and harming his or her own body but also blocking communication with God. A bitter person no longer has the desire to read the Word of God or pray. Bitterness is costly.

What should your plan of action be? At the first sign of anger or bitterness, go immediately to the person involved and deal with it–regardless of who is at fault. You will feel a wave of freedom sweep over you as you forgive.

On more than one occasion I have seen an individual healed of arthritis when he or she released bitterness and anger through total repentance. The person was first set free spiritually, then emotionally and physically. Don’t let deadly emotions rob you of life and health; forgive and be healed.


Don Colbert, M.D., is board-certified in family practice and in anti-aging medicine. He also has received extensive training in nutritional and preventive medicine, and he has helped millions of people discover the joy of living in divine health.

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Cancer overtakes heart disease among US Hispanics.


NEW YORK (AP) — Cancer has overtaken heart disease as the No. 1 killer among Hispanics in the U.S., and the rest of the country may be only a few years behind.

The change is not exactly cause for alarm. Death rates for both cancer and heart disease have been dropping for Hispanics and everyone else. It’s just that heart disease deaths have fallen faster, largely because of improved treatment and prevention, including the development of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

Overall, cancer will probably replace heart disease as the nation’s top cause of death in the next 10 years, said Rebecca Siegel of the American Cancer Society, lead author of a study reporting the new findings. Government health statisticians think the crossover point could be reached as early as this year, or at least in the next two or three years.

The reason it has already happened among Hispanics is that they are younger on average than non-Hispanic whites and blacks. And cancer tends to kill people earlier in life than heart disease, for decades the nation’s top cause of death.

The shift could bring about a change in disease-prevention efforts, government spending priorities and people’s attitudes.

“We’ve been so focused on heart disease mortality for so long. … This may change the way people look at their risk,” said Robert Anderson, who oversees the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control branch that monitors death statistics.

The study is being published in the September/October issue of a cancer society publication, CA: ACancer Journal for Clinicians.

Cancer society researchers looked at federal death data for 2009 and found that 29,935 Hispanics died of cancer and 29,611 of heart disease. It was the first year in which cancer deaths surpassed heart disease in that ethnic group.

Cancer is also the leading cause of death for Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders. And it is now the leading killer in 18 states, according to 2009 numbers from the CDC.

Hispanics are the nation’s largest and fastest-growing major ethnic group, and many of them are young immigrants from Mexico. Most heart disease deaths are in people 65 and older. The vast majority of Hispanics in the U.S. are under 55.

The story is different in Mexico, which has an older population. There, diabetes is the biggest killer, with cancer No. 2, according to 2009 statistics from the Pan American Health Organization.

Interestingly, none of the states where cancer has overtaken heart disease is in the Southwest, which has large Hispanic populations. Instead, most are in the nation’s northern tier, including Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Minnesota, Wisconsin and the four states of upper New England.

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Online:

Cancer Society journal: http://cacancerjournal.org

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By MIKE STOBBE | Associated Press

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