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Posts tagged ‘Republicans for Immigration Reform’

McCain: Immigration Reform Crucial to GOP Success.


Sen. John McCain says he hasn’t yet given up on immigration reform – and he believes failure to pass anything will hurt GOP chances at the ballot box.

“States like mine, over time, the demographics will overtake, not only mine but throughout the whole Southwest and many other parts of the country,” the Arizona Republican said Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union.” 

A failure to embrace Latino voters could spell doom as Republicans approach this years midterm congressional elections and the 2016 presidential campaign, McCain said.

Story continues below video.

The Senate, where McCain serves, has already passed immigration reform, but the effort is stalled in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives.

McCain said he will work see a bill passed through Congress for the president’s signature before the midterms.

“I have not given up hope that we will act, and we must act,” he said.

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© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.
By Greg Richter

Ryan, Republicans Blame Obama for Stalling Immigration.


Republicans are starting to lay the blame on President Barack Obama if an overhaul of the nation’s broken immigration system fails to become law.

The GOP’s emerging plan on immigration is to criticize Obama as an untrustworthy leader and his administration as an unreliable enforcer of any laws that might be passed. Perhaps realizing the odds of finding a consensus on immigration are long, the Republicans have started telling voters that if the GOP-led House doesn’t take action this election year, it is Obama’s fault.

“If the president had been serious about this the last five years, we’d be further along in this discussion,” Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, a Republican, said Sunday.

House Republicans last week unveiled a road map for an overhaul of the nation’s broken immigration system that calls for increased border security, better law enforcement within the U.S. and a pathway to legal status — but not citizenship — for millions of adults who live in America unlawfully. The proposal requires those here illegally to pay back taxes and fines.

But one of its backers, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, said distrust of Obama poisons interest among some in his Republican caucus.

“Here’s the issue that all Republicans agree on: We don’t trust the president to enforce the law,” said Ryan, his party’s vice presidential nominee in 2012.

Ryan said a plan that puts security first could only pass the House if lawmakers believe the administration would enforce it — an unlikely prospect given Republicans’ deep opposition to Obama. The president’s waivers for provisions in his 4-year-old health care law have increased suspicions among Republicans.

“This isn’t a trust-but-verify, this is a verify-then-trust approach,” Ryan said.

Asked whether immigration legislation would make its way to Obama for him to sign into law, Ryan said he was skeptical: “I really don’t know the answer to that question. That is clearly in doubt.”

The Senate last year passed a comprehensive, bipartisan bill that addressed border security, provided enforcement measures and offered a long and difficult path to citizenship for those living here illegally. The measure stalled in the GOP-led House, where leaders want to take a more piecemeal approach.

In the meantime, Republicans have started uniting behind a message that Obama won’t hold up his end of the bargain.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor said “there’s a lot of distrust of this administration in implanting the law.” And Republican Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., last week warned that distrust of Obama would trump the desire to find a solution for the estimated 11 million people living in the United States illegally.

“We just don’t think government will enforce the law anyway,” Rubio said, recounting conversations he’s had with fellow Republicans.

Immigration legislation is a dicey political question for the GOP. The party’s conservative base opposes any measure that would create a pathway to citizenship for immigrants living here illegally, but many in the party worry that failing to act could strengthen support among many voters for Democratic candidates.

In 2012, Obama won re-election with the backing of 71 percent of Hispanic voters and 73 percent of Asian voters. The issue is important to both voting blocs.

The White House, meanwhile, is trying to give Republicans a chance to hammer out their intra-party differences in the hopes they find a way to give legal standing to those here illegally.

“We ought to see a pathway to citizenship for people,” White House chief of staff Denis McDonough said Sunday. “We don’t want to have a permanent separation of classes or two permanent different classes of Americans in this country.”

McDonough said the White House remains optimistic that legislation that includes citizenship could reach the president’s desk: “We feel pretty good that we’ll get a bill done this year.”

Jindal spoke to CNN’s “State of the Union.” Ryan appeared on ABC’s “This Week.” Cantor was interviewed on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” McDonough appeared on NBC’s “Meet the Press” and CBS.

 

© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Source: Newsmax.com

GOP Lining Up Against Boehner Immigration Plan.


Image: GOP Lining Up Against Boehner Immigration Plan

By Lisa Barron

The GOP House leadership has yet to unveil its new framework for immigration reform, but conservatives are already gearing up for a challenge.

House Speaker John Boehner is expected to release a plan to fellow Republicans at a three-day Chesapeake Bay retreat starting Wednesday that would give millions of  immigrants already in the country illegally a path to legal status; it would also offer a path to citizenship for immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children.

That has some of the party’s conservative strategists pushing back publicly.

“It’s one of the few things that could actually disrupt what looks like a strong Republican year,” William Kristol, editor of The Weekly Standard, told The New York Times, calling the push “a recipe for disaster.”

National Review editorial on Monday  titled “Don’t Do It,” also argued against reform at this stage.

“The basic tactical reason not to act now is that the last thing the party needs is a brutal intramural fight when it has been dealt a winning hand on Obamacare,” the editors wrote.
“The other prudential reason not to act is that President Obama obviously can’t be trusted. Any immigration deal would have to trade enhanced enforcement for an amnesty. Since the president refuses to enforce key provisions of his own healthcare law, let alone provisions of immigration law he finds uncongenial, he obviously can’t be relied on to follow up on his end of any bargain,” they added.

Some legislators also are staunchly opposed to the plan. Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa believes that undocumented immigrants who are allowed to become citizens will eventually vote for Democrats, according to The Los Angeles Times.

“It’s political suicide for Republicans to do this,” he told the newspaper.

Meanwhile, President Barack Obama is expected to make his case for an overhaul of immigration policy in his State of the Union address Tuesday night.

“There are important economic consequences for passing immigration reform, from expanding economic opportunity to creating jobs, to reducing the deficit,” a senior administration official told The Los Angeles Times Monday, adding, “There are a whole lot of good reasons for the Congress to take action on this.”

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© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 

GOP Donors Urge Action on Immigration Reform.


More than 100 Republican donors and powerful members of the party are urging GOP lawmakers “to take action to fix our broken immigration system.”

Former Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez, founder of Republicans for Immigration Reform, organized the effort and said he wanted to approach lawmakers beforetheir August break, The New York Times reported.

“What tends to happen during the month of August is that members go home and they go to town hall meetings and they check up on their offices in terms of phone calls and letters, and that’s where they get bombarded,” Gutierrez told the Times. “So Republicans who are for immigration reform — and I believe there are many — we need to make our voice known in August.”

Latest: Do You Support Giving Illegals Citizenship? Vote Here Now 

The letter, sent Tuesday, presses for legal status for the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States.

Joining Gutierrez in signing the letter were a number of former government officials, corporate executives, and prominent members of the GOP. According to the Times, they included political strategist Karl Rove, former Vice President Dan Quayle, Melaleuca Inc. founder Frank VanderSloot, and Staples founder Tom Stemberg.

The Senate passed an immigration measure in June, but House Republicans are hesitant to support the bill because it provides a pathway to citizenship for all illegal immigrants and, they say, does too little to guarantee the security of the border with Mexico.

The letter, the Times reported, calls on lawmakers to include three important elements as part of a comprehensive immigration-reform bill.

“To fix our immigration system we need meaningful reforms that will (1) secure our borders, (2) provide a legal way for U.S.-based companies to hire the workers they need while making it impossible to hire workers here illegally, and (3) take control of our undocumented-immigration problem by providing a path to legal status for undocumented immigrants who pay penalties and back taxes, pass criminal-background checks, and go to the back of the line,” the letter states.

Doing nothing, the letter warns, is the same as granting “de facto amnesty” to immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

The Republicans argue in the letter that comprehensive reform is both smart policy and smart politics, and they point out that the GOP has a natural bond with most immigrants, since many of the party’s members have strong conservative values.

“Immigrants are often entrepreneurial, family-minded and guided by faith,” the letter states. “These are Republican values. Immigrants play key roles at every level of the American economy. From high-skill workers to seasonal laborers, from big-city neighborhoods to small-town main streets, immigrants help drive our economic growth.

“These are Republican issues. Republicans ought to be welcoming immigrants and be seen as doing so.”

Latest: Do You Support Giving Illegals Citizenship? Vote Here Now 

© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

By Courtney Coren

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