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Posts tagged ‘Samaritan Woman at the Well’

Respond to Your Call to Influence.


 

group of women
(http://www.stockfreeimages.com)

The church has not always recognized the spiritual gifts of women. But God has fashioned them to be key players in His kingdom.

Let’s imagine for a moment what the world would be like without women. All the wonderful traits women are capable of providing with exuberance—gentleness, nurture, care, refined beauty—would be missing.

Men possess these same qualities but in smaller supply; women, on the other hand, overflow with them. Without women the world would look like an army base where everything’s painted white or gray and designed for efficiency at the expense of beauty. An awful sense of incompleteness would permeate the planet.

Women have many qualities unique to their gender, one of the grandest being the ability to host life. This privilege to shelter another life at such an intimate level has been granted exclusively to Eve and her daughters.

Women can nurture their newborns through the most intimate interaction between a female adult and a child: breastfeeding. The image of a baby being nursed by a loving mother is a picture of total dependency, perfect care and the most sublime transfer of nurture from one being to another.

Women are also the ones who predominantly shape the character of their children during their crucial early years. They plant tender gestures in the inner layer of a child’s malleable soul and watch as, like the seeds in a flowerbed, the spiritual seeds sprout, spreading beauty over the adult landscape in the form of noble deeds.

When were the seeds planted? During the nurturing years when a child spends most of his time with a woman: his mother!

Jesus’ First Teacher
It was a woman, young Mary, who first heard beating within her the heart of God Incarnate when she was pregnant with Jesus. It was her hands that first touched Jesus’ body and wrapped Him in swaddling clothes.

Think for a moment what this reflects: God Almighty, Creator and Preserver of the universe, took the form of a baby and became dependent on the care of one of His creatures. When God experienced human flesh, with all its limitations, who was there to meet His needs? A woman.

Jesus’ mother, Mary, was His first teacher and also later His first disciple. No other human knew Jesus as intimately as Mary did.

Ponder for a moment the scene at Calvary. While most of Jesus’ frightened disciples hid at a distance, Mary and a group of faithful women gathered at the foot of the cross. Despite the pain and suffering Jesus endured, His last earthly concern was for a woman—His mother.

He could not forget that she had taken care of Him when His earthly life began. And now, as His life was about to end, Jesus lovingly turned her over to the care of His beloved disciple (see John 19:26-27).

Women’s Hall of Fame
Throughout the Bible are inspiring testimonies of other brave and brilliant women who were not mere privates in God’s army but key players who were given pivotal assignments at strategic points and in crucial times.

Moses’ mother challenged the pharaoh’s genocidal decree when she preserved the life of the one who would eventually lead millions of Hebrews to freedom (see Ex. 2).

Rahab held the keys to the taking of Jericho. By turning them in the right direction she assured the fall of the fortress city (see Josh. 2).

Hannah cried out to God for Samuel to be born, and he went on to become the greatest prophet and judge Israel ever knew (see 1 Sam. 1).

Deborah was an illustrious judge and a proven prophetess who delivered Israel from the mighty chariots of Jabin, the oppressing king of Canaan. Another woman, Jael, helped to bring total destruction to Jabin and his leading general, Sisera (see Judges 4-5).

Esther courageously risked her life to save her nation, God’s people, when they were in danger of being exterminated.

Sarah was called “mother of nations” by God Himself (see Gen. 17:16) and is listed among the heroes of the faith in Hebrews 11.

Priscilla and her husband, Aquila, instructed and guided Apollos, who had been preaching less-than-perfect theology (see Acts 18: 24-26). The fact that in most tranlations, Priscilla is listed first in this passage signifies the prominence of her role.

On the shoulders of these women—and countless more down through the ages—rested the fate of cities, tribes and nations.

Pillars of the Early Church
One of the main reasons Christianity spread so rapidly in the early years is because its message restored honor and self-worth to half the world’s population: women. Romans had such a low view of women that some men engaged in sex with other men. Jewish rabbis completely silenced women inside the synagogue, and pagans used them as temple prostitutes.

However, early church leaders dignified women by teaching that in Christ “there is neither male nor female” and we “are all one in Christ Jesus” (Gal. 3:28, NKJV). Women were also given positions of honor and leadership.

Priscilla, for instance, was part of the team that founded the church in Ephesus—site of the greatest power encounter recorded in the book of Acts. She was there, inside the crux of God’s power, when God dethroned Artemis and brought down the demonic socioeconomic structure that had controlled Ephesus.

Throughout the epistles women are unapologetically exalted as pillars of the faith. Paul identified two women as the headwaters of Timothy’s faith: his mother and his grandmother (see 2 Tim. 1:5). In Romans, a letter intended for wide circulation and public reading, Paul praised several women as people of faith and proven ministry (see Rom. 16:1-15).

The first European convert was a woman, Lydia, and hers was the first household to be baptized (see Acts 16:14-15). She was very assertive in her interaction with the apostles: “She begged us, saying, ‘If you have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come to my house and stay.’ So she persuaded us” (v. 15).

Three centuries later, the driving force behind Constantine’s conversion and the subsequent Christianization of the Roman Empire was another woman, Helena, the emperor’s mother.

Extraordinary Sensitivity
Women have an extraordinary sensitivity to spiritual things. I am not saying that they are more godly than men, but I believe they are definitely more spiritual. This is why Jesus was able to reveal two of the most powerful truths in the gospels to women.

He told Martha that He is the resurrection and the life (see John 11:25-27). To the Samaritan woman Jesus explained that He is the living water (see John 4:7-15). These women were in a state of confusion when Jesus found them, but both were able to hear, understand and believe these profound truths.

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God Is Still on the Throne.


Janet Boynes
Janet Boynes (Avalon Photography)

The recent Supreme Court rulings on the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and Proposition 8 have little to do with victory or defeat but much to do with where we put our trust. Neither God nor His Word ever changes. He affirms and reaffirms to every generation, “I am the Lord, I do not change” (Mal. 3:6).

These rulings, while disappointing, should come as no surprise. They remind us of man’s proclivity for making bad decisions that contradict God’s Word. But does this mean we lose hope, give in to discouragement and retreat in defeat? No! We press in and press on as God’s faithful people, keeping our eyes on Him who leads us to ultimate victory.

Those of us who believe the Scriptures know we are living in a day and hour when many hearts are growing cold and many Christians are turning away from the faith. I ask you today: In whom do you put your faith? Is your faith in God or man? Paul said, “Your faith should not be in the wisdom of men but in the power of God” (1 Cor. 2:5).

We are constantly bombarded with distortions and derision from the naysayers in the gay community, but in the end what they say really doesn’t matter. The only thing that matters is what God says. In the remnant church of the last days, His Word is the only thing that will sustain us.

Listen to what the Bible says in John’s Gospel when Jesus encountered a Samaritan woman and violated all the rules of propriety and protocol by striking up a conversation with her:

“Jesus, tired as he was from the journey, sat down by the well. It was about noon.

“When a Samaritan woman came to draw water, Jesus said to her, ‘Will you give me a drink?’ (His disciples had gone into the town to buy food.)

“The Samaritan woman said to him, ‘You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?’ (For Jews do not associate with Samaritans.)

“Jesus answered her, ‘If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water.’

“‘Sir,’ the woman said, ‘you have nothing to draw with and the well is deep. Where can you get this living water? Are you greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did also his sons and his livestock?’

“Jesus answered, ‘Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.’

“The woman said to him, ‘Sir, give me this water so that I won’t get thirsty and have to keep coming here to draw water.’

“He told her, ‘Go, call your husband and come back.’

“‘I have no husband,’ she replied.

“Jesus said to her, ‘You are right when you say you have no husband. The fact is, you have had five husbands, and the man you now have is not your husband. What you have just said is quite true.’

“‘Sir,’ the woman said, ‘I can see that you are a prophet. Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”

“‘Woman,’ Jesus replied, ‘believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.’

“The woman said, ‘I know that Messiah (called Christ) is coming. When he comes, he will explain everything to us.

“Then Jesus declared, ‘I, the one speaking to you—I am he'” (John 4:6–26, NIV).

Jesus offers every one of us the same thing He offered that Samaritan woman: living water that quenches thirst eternally and becomes a spring welling up from within to eternal life.

What I want to say today to all my brothers and sisters in Christ is this: If you feel tired and worn out from the battle, stop and drink from His well of living water. Rest in Him. Allow Him to renew your strength. Be encouraged! Keep hope alive! God is not caught off guard or perplexed by what is happening. He knew before the foundation of the earth that this day would arrive.

Let me remind you there are many men and women who have been changed through the power of the Holy Spirit and have left the homosexual life. Many marriages and families have been restored. Even if you haven’t heard about them, they are out there. God will, in His time, bring their testimonies to light.

We know that homosexuality is dividing families, political parties and churches all over America. Nevertheless, God is still on His throne! If you have a family member or friend living a homosexual life, don’t despair. God saved you, didn’t He? What He did for you, He can and will do for them. Grab hold of His word: “You and all your household will be saved” (Acts 11:14).

It’s time for all of us to stand on His Word. Then and only then will we see the manifestation of the power of God working in our lives. We are the light of this world, and we will continue to shine! God is still in the business of reaching people, changing lives and making all things new.

Source: CHARISMA NEWS.

JANET BOYNES

Janet Boynes is the founder of Janet Boynes Ministries, a nondenominational outreach that ministers to individuals questioning their sexuality and those who wish to leave homosexuality. As the author of Called Out, Boynes chronicles her story of living as a lesbian for 14 years until God called her out of that lifestyle.

Reclaiming Culture One Community at a Time.


Os Hillman
Os Hillman

“And many of the Samaritans of that city believed in Him because of the word of the woman who testified” (John 4:39).

Can a city or community be impacted for Christ? Can it be transformed?

The answer to that lies with the level of maturity of Christians in a community, which is measured in love, unity and prayer.

Jesus spent three years with His disciples, and yet after three years they thought the way to deal with people different from themselves or who were adversarial was to call down fire from heaven:

“But they did not receive Him, because His face was set for the journey to Jerusalem. And when His disciples James and John saw this, they said, ‘Lord, do You want us to command fire to come down from heaven and consume them, just as Elijah did?’ But He turned and rebuked them, and said, ‘You do not know what manner of spirit you are of. For the Son of Man did not come to destroy men’s lives but to save them.’ And they went to another village” (Luke 9:51-56).

The disciples modeled what the church does today. We condemn people who are different or who hold different views, or we condemn them for acting like people who do not know God. The church has often tried to change culture by controlling it, instead of loving it. Instead, Jesus calls us to love people and build bridges into their lives. Yes, it even means, God forbid, gays, adulterers and even liberals—yes, anyone different from ourselves. Jesus loves them too, even in their sin. That is hard for us to model in the body of Christ. We all struggle to love those very different from ourselves.

In 2011, we had a conference at Harvard, and the speakers were protested on campus by radical gays. Instead of reacting to them, God made a way for me and another leader to meet with them. First, we listened to what they had to say. Afterward, they let us share with them why their assessment of us was incorrect. Lastly, we upheld the relationship even though we had differing views. They left the meeting with a 180-degree different viewpoint than when they walked into our meeting. Did they get saved? No. Did they have a different view of us than before they met us? Yes. Was there a bridge built? Yes. God can water that kind of relationship building, and He has actually done so since then.

“I catch them; the Lord cleans them.”

That is what Larry Poland, president of MasterMedia, said at one of our conferences. He serves executives in Hollywood and New York. He said, “You know, it is amazing how scripts change once there is a heart change.”

We are not the Holy Spirit in people’s lives. Our role is to love and share. That’s it. Then love some more.

Jesus and the Samaritan Woman
Let’s discover how Jesus did it. Please read the story of Jesus and the Samaritan woman:

“Then the woman of Samaria said to Him, ‘How is it that You, being a Jew, ask a drink from me, a Samaritan woman?’ For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans. Jesus answered and said to her, ‘If you knew the gift of God, and who it is who says to you, “Give Me a drink,” you would have asked Him, and He would have given you living water’” (John 4:9-10).

Jesus talked to the woman and spoke into her life. The disciples were shocked that Jesus spoke to a woman who was also a Samaritan. Both were off-limits during His day. But Jesus broke the social barrier. The result? The city was impacted:

“And many of the Samaritans of that city believed in Him because of the word of the woman who testified, ‘He told me all that I ever did.’ So when the Samaritans had come to Him, they urged Him to stay with them; and He stayed there two days. And many more believed because of His own word. Then they said to the woman, ‘Now we believe, not because of what you said, for we ourselves have heard Him and we know that this is indeed the Christ, the Savior of the world’” (vv. 39-42).

Here is what Jesus did:

  • He listened and engaged in conversation.
  • He spoke into her life.
  • He gave her information and spoke prophetically.
  • He did not give her the Four Laws.
  • He did not condemn her.
  • He spoke supernaturally into her life.
  • He gave her an opportunity to believe.

The result was:

  • Her life was impacted by His speaking into her life.
  • She shared her experience with others.
  • The citizens of the city invited Jesus to stay for two days.
  • Many believed in Jesus!

That is your formula for community impact.

Source: CHARISMA NEWS.

OS HILLMAN


Os Hillman is president of Marketplace Leaders and author of Change Agent and TGIF Today God Is First, a free email devotional.

How to Create a Multiethnic Vision for Your Church.



D-Min-Life Mulit-Ethnic
© istockphoto/Yuri_Arcurs

In 1990 my wife, Karen, and I began an endeavor that would forever change our lives. What began as a church plant became a radical reordering of our personal priorities and approach to ministry. We became painfully aware during our early days as church-planting pastors that we were far off course from God’s heart toward people of different ethnicity than us.

We slowly realized our ignorance of the daily issues that affected people of color. We also became aware that our day-to-day lives were void of any genuine friendships with non-whites. We, of course, “loved everybody.” The problem was you couldn’t tell it by our lifestyle or relationships.

I began to ask, “Why don’t our churches look like heaven?” Out of that question rose a powerful new quest in our lives.

A Miracle of the Heart

What we’ve learned since then is that breaking the ethnicity barrier first requires a “miracle of the heart”—an inner awakening that changes your core attitude and thinking about yourself and those who are culturally different.

In the early church, Peter and Cornelius were the first to experience this miracle of the heart (see Acts 10:34-11:18). It had been 10 years since the day of Pentecost, yet the church was still oddly exclusive. Having never captured that spirit of Jesus which made “whosoever will” feel as though they “belonged,” the church after 10 years primarily was all about converting Jews and few others.

But the Holy Spirit revealed to these two men that something was desperately missing in their lives and in the church. The chasm between the Jew and the Gentile needed healing, and it needed to happen now.

Change by Example

For churches to break the color barrier, we as leaders of the church must model our own personal necessity for multi-ethnic friendships. Otherwise, our congregations will see our attempts as mere token experiments to grow a struggling church.

Unless the Holy Spirit is allowed to perform a personal miracle of love in your heart, then both you and your church will be pulled back toward your comfort zones of including only people just like you. Even after the miracle of the heart that occurred in the house of Cornelius, many in the church went right back to their comfort zones. Today, many of our churches are doing the same, convinced they’re best equipped to reach only people like them. Thankfully, some in the church recognized the need: “But some of them … spoke to the Hellenists [or Greeks], preaching the Lord Jesus” (Acts 11:20).

Like the early church, every newly planted church in America today must have a strong sense about its multi-ethnic mission or it will remain unnoticed by its community. Those pastors and leaders who press in and develop strong, healthy multi-ethnic ministries will be the leaders and influencers of this generation.

The Road Through Samaria

Because I now seek to experience God’s completeness for the church, I want next-door neighbors and working relationships with friends of diverse ethnicities. Without those kinds of relationships in my life, I would again feel incomplete, a condition that for me is now totally unacceptable.

As long as we remain insensitive and obstinate in our denial and continue to walk “around” Samaria instead of being like Jesus who walked “through” Samaria (John 4:1-26), then nothing will change. Because they avoided Samaria, it took the Jews three extra days on foot to get from Judea to Galilee. Jesus would have had to go out of His way to not reach the Samaritan woman. It took more effort to avoid than to love. By connecting, He gave her—and her city—a renewed dignity because He carefully chose His road. And that road is still the one worth traveling.

Written by Scott Hagan


Scott Hagan is a church planter at heart, having planted several churches, including the one he and his wife, Karen, currently lead in Sacramento, Calif. He is a regular columnist for Charisma and Enrichment Journal and author of They Walked With the Savior and They Felt the Spirit’s Touch.

Reclaiming Culture One Community at a Time.


Os Hillman

And many of the Samaritans of that city believed in Him because of the word of the woman who testified…” (John 4:39).

Can a city or community be impacted for Christ? Can it be transformed?

The answer to that lies with the level of maturity of Christians in a community which is measured in love, unity and prayer.

Jesus spent three years with his disciples, and yet after three years they thought the way to deal with people different from themselves or were adversarial was to call down fire from heaven.

But they did not receive Him, because His face was set for the journey to Jerusalem.  And when His disciples James and John saw this, they said, “Lord, do You want us to command fire to come down from heaven and consume them, just as Elijah did?” But He turned and rebuked them, and said, “You do not know what manner of spirit you are of.  For the Son of Man did not come to destroy men’s lives but to save them.” And they went to another village (Luke 9:51-56).

The disciples modeled what the church does today. We condemn people who are different or hold different views or condemn them for acting like people who do not know God. The church has often tried to change culture by controlling it, instead of loving it.  Instead, Jesus calls us to love people and build bridges into their lives. Yes, it even means, God forbid, —gays, adulterers, and even liberals—yes, anyone different from ourselves. Jesus loves them too, even in their sin. That is hard for us to model in the body of Christ. We all struggle to love those very different from ourselves.

In 2011 we had a conference at Harvard and the speakers were protested on campus by radical gays. Instead of reacting to them, God made a way for me and another leader to meet with them. First, we listened to what they had to say. Afterwards, they let us share with them why their assessment of us was incorrect. Lastly, we upheld the relationship even though we had differing views. They left the meeting with a 180 degree different viewpoint than when they walked into our meeting. Did they get saved? No. Did they have a different view of us than before they met us? Yes. Was there a bridge built? Yes. God can water that kind of relationship building and He has actually done so since then.

“I catch them; the Lord cleans them.”

That is what Larry Poland, President of MasterMedia said at one of our conferences. He serves executives in Hollywood and New York. He said, “You know, it is amazing how scripts change once there is a heart change.” We are not the Holy Spirit in people’s lives. Our role is to love and share. That’s it. Then love some more.

Jesus and Samaritan Woman

Let’s discover how Jesus did it. Please read the story of Jesus and the Samaritan woman:

Then the woman of Samaria said to Him, “How is it that You, being a Jew, ask a drink from me, a Samaritan woman?” For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans. Jesus answered and said to her, “If you knew the gift of God, and who it is who says to you, ‘Give Me a drink, ’ you would have asked Him, and He would have given you living water” (John 4:9,10 NKJV).

Jesus talked to the woman and spoke into her life. The disciples were shocked that Jesus spoke to a woman who was also a Samaritan. Both were off limits during His day. But Jesus broke the social barrier. The result? The city was impacted.

And many of the Samaritans of that city believed in Him because of the word of the woman who testified, “He told me all that I ever did.”  So when the Samaritans had come to Him, they urged Him to stay with them; and He stayed there two days.  And many more believed because of His own word. Then they said to the woman, “Now we believe, not because of what you said, for we ourselves have heard Him and we know that this is indeed the Christ, the Savior of the world”(John 4:39-42).

Here is what Jesus did.

1. He listened and engaged in conversation.
2. He spoke into her life.
3. He gave her information and spoke prophetically.

He did not give her the Four Laws.
He did not condemn her. He spoke supernaturally into her life.
He gave her an opportunity to believe.

The result was

  • Her life was impacted by his speaking into her life.
  • She shared her experience with others.
  • The citizens of the city invited Jesus to stay for two days.

Many believed in Jesus!

That is your formula for community impact.

Os Hillman is president of Marketplace Leaders and author of Change Agent and TGIF Today God Is First , a free email devotional

Publication date: May 9, 2013

Reclaiming Culture One Community at a Time.


Os Hillman
Os Hillman (Facebook)

Can a city or community be impacted for Christ? Can it be transformed?

The answer to those questions lies with the level of maturity of Christians in a community that is measured in love, unity and prayer.

Jesus spent three years with His disciples, and yet after three years, they thought the way to deal with people different from themselves or those who were adversarial was to call down fire from heaven:

“But they did not receive Him, because His face was set for the journey to Jerusalem. And when His disciples James and John saw this, they said, ‘Lord, do You want us to command fire to come down from heaven and consume them, just as Elijah did?’ But He turned and rebuked them, and said, ‘You do not know what manner of spirit you are of. For the Son of Man did not come to destroy men’s lives but to save them.’ And they went to another village” (Luke 9:51-56).

The disciples modeled what the church does today. We condemn people who are different or hold different views, or we condemn them for acting like people who do not know God. The church has often tried to change culture by controlling it, instead of loving it. Instead, Jesus calls us to love people and build bridges into their lives. Yes, it even means, God forbid, gays, adulterers and even liberals—yes, anyone different from ourselves. Jesus loves them too, even in their sin. That is hard for us to model in the body of Christ. We all struggle to love those very different from ourselves.

In 2011, we had a conference at Harvard, and the speakers were protested on campus by radical gays. Instead of reacting to them, God made a way for me and another leader to meet with them. First, we listened to what they had to say. Afterward, they let us share with them why their assessment of us was incorrect. Lastly, we upheld the relationship even though we had differing views. They left the meeting with a 180-degree different viewpoint than when they walked into our meeting.

Did they get saved? No. Did they have a different view of us than before they met us? Yes. Was there a bridge built? Yes. God can water that kind of relationship-building, and He has actually done so since then.

“I catch them; the Lord cleans them.”

That is what Larry Poland, president of MasterMedia, said at one of our conferences. He serves executives in Hollywood and New York. He said, “You know, it is amazing how scripts change once there is a heart change.” We are not the Holy Spirit in people’s lives. Our role is to love and share. That’s it. Then love some more.

Jesus and the Samaritan Woman

Let’s discover how Jesus did it. Please read the story of Jesus and the Samaritan woman:

“Then the woman of Samaria said to Him, ‘How is it that You, being a Jew, ask a drink from me, a Samaritan woman?’ For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans. Jesus answered and said to her, ‘If you knew the gift of God, and who it is who says to you, “Give Me a drink,” you would have asked Him, and He would have given you living water’” (John 4:9-10, NKJV).

Jesus talked to the woman and spoke into her life. The disciples were shocked that Jesus spoke to a woman who was also a Samaritan. Both were off-limits during His day. But Jesus broke the social barrier. The result? The city was impacted:

“And many of the Samaritans of that city believed in Him because of the word of the woman who testified, ‘He told me all that I ever did.’ So when the Samaritans had come to Him, they urged Him to stay with them; and He stayed there two days. And many more believed because of His own word. Then they said to the woman, ‘Now we believe, not because of what you said, for we ourselves have heard Him and we know that this is indeed the Christ, the Savior of the world’” (vv. 39-42).

Here is what Jesus did:

  • He listened and engaged in conversation.
  • He spoke into her life.
  • He gave her information and spoke prophetically.
  • He did not give her the Four Laws.
  • He did not condemn her.
  • He spoke supernaturally into her life.
  • He gave her an opportunity to believe.

The result was:

  • Her life was impacted by His speaking into her life.
  • She shared her experience with others.
  • The citizens of the city invited Jesus to stay for two days.
  • Many believed in Jesus!

That is your formula for community impact.

“And many of the Samaritans of that city believed in Him because of the word of the woman who testified” (v. 39).

Source: CHARISMA MAGAZINE/ NEW MAN.

OS HILLMAN/TODAY FIRST

Os Hillman is president of Marketplace Leaders and author of Change Agent and TGIF Today God Is First, a free email devotional.

Field Work: The Harvesters.


Behold, I say to you, lift up your eyes and look at the fields, for they are already white for harvest!
John 4:35b

Recommended Reading
John 4:27-38 ( http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John%204:27-38&version=NKJV )

While waiting for His disciples to do their grocery shopping, Jesus shared the Gospel with a woman of Samaria who needed direction in life. Because of His witness to her and of her subsequent witness to others, many fellow townspeople sought out the Lord Jesus. As the disciples returned with their food, they saw a mass of white-robed Samaritans flocking to Jesus. It looked like fields ripe unto harvest. (John 4)

Watch This Week’s TV Broadcast  (  http://www.davidjeremiah.org/site/television.aspx?tid=email_watchedevo )

The work of soul winning is likened in Scripture to sowing and reaping. The psalmist said, “He who continually goes forth weeping, bearing seed for sowing, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him” (Psalm 126:6). The apostle Paul said, “Let us not grow weary while doing good, for in due season we shall reap if we do not lose heart” (Galatians 6:9).

Try evangelizing as you walk around today. You never know when a word, a tract, an invitation, a Bible verse, or a sentence of testimony will become a harvest-bearing seed. The Bible says, “He who wins souls is wise” (Proverbs 11:30).

The Gospel soul winner does not simply persuade people … he sows the wonderful living seed of the Word of God.
John R. Rice, in  The Soul-Winner’s Fire

Read-Thru-the-Bible
2 Kings 6-10

By David Jeremiah.

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