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Posts tagged ‘Taiwan’

Kerry: China Willing to Pressure NKorea on Nukes.


Secretary of State John Kerry said on Friday China is willing to exert more pressure to get North Korea to give up its nuclear program.

He told reporters in Beijing he was pleased that China “could not have more forcefully reiterated its commitment” to the goal of denuclearizing North Korea.

The reclusive Asian state has defied international warnings not to build atomic bombs and long-range missiles. It is believed to have enough fissile material to build up to 10 nuclear bombs, but most intelligence analysts say it has yet to master the technology to deploy such weapons.

“I encouraged the Chinese to use every tool at their disposal, all of the means of persuasion that they have, building on the depths of their long and historic and cultural and common history (with North Korea),” he said.

“They made it very clear that if the North doesn’t comply and come to the table and be serious about talks and stop its program … they are prepared to take additional steps in order to make sure their policy is implemented,” Kerry said, adding the United States and China were now discussing “the specifics of how you do that”.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told Kerry China would work with all parties concerned, including the United States, to play a constructive role for the region’s peace and stability.

“China will never allow chaos or war on the Korean Peninsula,” Wang said, according to China’s Foreign Ministry.

North Korea was raised during Kerry’s meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping, the Foreign Ministry said, with Xi “setting forth China’s stance”. It gave no other details.

The East and South China Seas featured prominently on Kerry’s agenda too, with him calling for a “more rule of law based, less confrontational regime”.

The United States is uneasy about what it sees as China’s effort to gain creeping control over waters in the Asia-Pacific region, including its Nov. 23 declaration of an air defence identification zone (ADIZ) in an area of the East China Sea that includes islands at the centre of a dispute with Japan.

China claims about 90 percent of the 3.5 million square km (1.35 million square mile) South China Sea, depicting what it sees as its area on maps with a so-called nine-dash line, looping far out over the sea from south China.

China and the Association of South East Asian Nations have been discussing a code of conduct for the South China Sea, and Kerry said he believed China was ready to achieve that goal.

“That would help reduce tensions that stem from the territorial and maritime disputes and, in the meantime, it’s very important that everybody build crisis management tools and refrain from coercive or unilateral measures to assert whatever claims any country in the region may have,” he said.

Wang said China was committed to a peaceful resolution for both the East and South China Seas disputes, but urged the United States not take sides and said China had an “unshakable resolve” to protect its sovereignty.

The United States should “respect historical facts and China’s sovereign interests, adhere to an objective and impartial stance and take tangible actions to promote mutual trust in the region so as to safeguard regional peace and stability”, Wang said.

Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Taiwan also have claims over the South China Sea, or parts of it.

Kerry said he told China it would be a bad idea to establish an air defence identification zone in the South China Sea, similar to the one it set up over the East China Sea late last year, which prompted protests from Washington, Tokyo and Seoul.

“We have made it very clear that a unilateral, unannounced, unprocessed initiative like that can be very challenging to certain people in the region, and therefore to regional stability,” he said.

Wang said China was confident it could maintain peace in the South China Sea by working with ASEAN, and denounced efforts by “certain people internationally” to hype up tensions and “spread untruths”. “China is resolutely opposed to this,” Wang said, without elaborating.

Climate change was also on the agenda of Kerry’s talks.

“We need to see if working together we could identify any further steps that we may be able to take, specifically with respect to arrival at meaningful targets with respect to the 2015 climate change conference that will take place in Paris in December of next year,” Kerry said.

 

© 2014 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.
Source: Newsmax.com

Why China Is Practicing for an Invasion of Taiwan.


Image: Why China Is Practicing for an Invasion of Taiwan

Supply trucks cross a river during China’s Mission 2013B last month, practice for an invasion of Taiwan. (China Online)

The perception that U.S. leadership in the world is flagging likely inspired China to conduct a large-scale military drill using 20,000 troops this month in what experts say was a mock invasion of Taiwan. The danger lies not in how the United States reacts to the drill, which was broadcast to the world, but in not reacting at all and continuing to take great pains not to describe China as an enemy.

Click here to read the full analysis from top intelligence experts at LIGNET.com.

© 2013 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

By LIGNET Wires

6 Simple Secrets to Success in Ministry.


Ignite-CrowdIgnite crowd

What a week it was! Deborah and I attended Ignite 2013 along with over 9000 Filipino students plus hundreds of students andEvery Nation campus missionaries from Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Guam, India, Indonesia, Japan, Mongolia, Taiwan, Timor-Leste, Vietnam and others. Rather than writing a long wordy blog about the conference, here are some photos that are worth a thousand words each. Click and enjoy.

Every time we have international guests visit us in Manila, someone will eventually ask me about the “secret” or the “keys” or the “secret keys” to our success and growth.  Here’s my current answer.

1. Calling. Figure out what God wants you to do with your life. Not what your friends, parents, and culture want you to do. God has a unique calling for you. Some people figure that out. Some don’t. Success starts when we find out what God wants us to do.

2. Commitment. Work hard. Go all in. No holds barred. Be obsessed. Burn the candle at both ends, and the middle. My Dad taught me hard work, and the Bible confirmed it. Some people can’t spell work ethic. They are lazy and they will never succeed until they embrace hard work. And for those who are working hard with little to show for it: after you have worked hard for several years, keep working and continue believing. Refuse to quit. Don’t quit when it gets tough. Don’t quit when it gets costly. Don’t quit when everyone tells you it is not worth it. Those who quit do not succeed. Those who refuse to quit eventually succeed. In summary: work hard and keep working hard for a long time.

3. Community. Your calling is bigger than you. What God wants you to do cannot be done alone. You will need a team to be successful. (I am forever grateful that God lets me work with the best team on the planet!)

4.  Concentration. Stay focused on what God called and gifted you to do. Do not diversify. Do not multitask. Do not attempt to do everything that can be done in the name of God. You cannot meet every need. Find the needs God wants you to meet, and concentrate on doing that the best you possibly can. We have been successful because we stuck with the “same ole boring strokes” for three decades. We have never jumped on the “get-big-quick” flavor of the month. We know what we are called to do (see #5 and #6 below), and we simply concentrate on that and nothing else.

5. Honor God. This is the ultimate motive for all we do, and the ultimate measure of real success.

6. Make Disciples. Period.

In summary, find out what God wants you to do and keep doing that and nothing else—for a long, long, long time.

Written by Steve Murrell


Steve and Deborah Murrell went to the Philippines in 1984 for a one-month summer mission trip that never ended. They are the founding pastors of Victory Manila, one church that meets in 14 locations in Metro Manila and has planted churches in 60 Philippine cities and 20 nations. Currently, Victory has more than 6,000 discipleship groups that meet in coffee shops, offices, dormitories and homes in Metro Manila. Steve is co-founder and president of Every Nation Churches and Ministries, a family of churches focused on church planting, campus ministry and world missions.

For the original blog, visit stevemurrell.com.

Frustrated Taiwan Vents Anger at Philippines.


TAIPEI, Taiwan — Sitting in Taipei’s main commercial center as office workers filed out for lunch, Y.S. Liu mourned the collapse of her import business. Her president, she said, had failed to deliver.

The 60-year-old blamed Ma Ying-jeou, whose approval rating is 14 percent, for an economy that grew at one of the slowest rates in Asia last year, sparking January protests that helped trigger the resignation of Premier Sean Chen. When a Philippine patrol boat crew killed a Taiwanese fisherman a week ago, Liu and others found an outlet for their fear of being bypassed in Asia’s recovery.

“We’ve been frustrated for so long,” Liu said, adding Ma should be even tougher on the Philippines. “We’re so full of anger, so disappointed and dissatisfied with our government.”

Ma is seizing the moment to press President Benigno Aquino for a formal apology as Taiwan grocers pull Philippine goods from stores and travel agencies cancel trips, an approach that risks denting efforts to boost trade ties in Asia. His reaction may say more about Taiwan’s feeling of weakness in a region of emerging powers that don’t officially recognize its government.

“The whole world is bullying us, so we have to bully someone weaker than us,” said George Tsai, a political scientist at Chinese Culture University in Taipei. “Taiwanese have accumulated so much frustration and anger. Collectively, we’re trying to find an outlet. At such a moment, the Ma administration can only be tough.”

The diplomatic spat started on May 9, when a Philippine patrol boat fired at least 32 bullets at a Taiwanese boat in waters claimed by both sides, killing a 65-year-old fisherman. Ma threatened economic retaliation if Aquino didn’t meet four demands: apologize, compensate the family, agree to talks on disputed fishing zones and start an investigation.

The Philippines, which doesn’t formally recognize Taiwan under its one-China policy, agreed to all the demands except a government apology. Aquino offered to apologize on behalf of the Filipino people.

Ma rejected it outright. Within 24 hours, his government began military exercises off its southern coast, told people to stop traveling to the Philippines and froze the hiring of Filipino workers. State-run Taiwan Sugar, with 12 outlets stocking snacks and other products made in the Philippines, took items off its shelves.

“People want justice, and our voice to be heard by the international community,” Wei Huang, manager at a Taiwan Sugar store in Taipei, said after removing more than 100 products. “We should use whatever leverage we have.”

Taiwan also moved to halt already-limited diplomatic engagement, including ministerial meetings under the World Health Assembly, a body of the World Health Organization. Sixteen Taiwan-based exhibitors withdrew from the International Food Expo in Manila.

Taiwan’s media has fueled the public outcry, with front- page headlines declaring “Philippine Government, Rotten to the Core.” Groups congregated outside the house of the dead fisherman.

“This is something very unusual,” said Samuel C.Y. Ku, a professor at the Institute of China and Asia-Pacific Studies in Taiwan. “We haven’t seen this kind of social outrage from a specific event.”

The U.S., which is a treaty ally to the Philippines and helps maintain Taiwan’s defense, urged both sides to avoid an escalation.

China condemned the killing and demanded the Philippines begin an investigation. Taiwan has been ruled separately since Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang party fled China in 1949 after a civil war, and the Communist Party deems the island a renegade province.

Ma improved ties with China after he was first elected in 2008, ending a six-decade ban on direct transport links. Since his re-election in January 2012, his popularity has plummeted as the economy slowed compared to others in the region, which are moving ahead on trade agreements that exclude Taiwan.

Taiwan’s gross domestic product grew 1.3 percent last year, according to the Asian Development Bank, slower than South Korea, China and most Southeast Asian nations. The opposition Democratic Progressive Party led the January protest in Taipei over Ma’s economic management that drew tens of thousands of people.

When it comes to the dispute with the Philippines, however, Ma’s opponents are with him. DPP chairman Su Tseng-chang said Taiwan needed to present a united front despite Ma’s other shortcomings.

“This is a matter of dignity,” said J.J. Tsai, a 40-year- old housewife, as she shopped in one of Taiwan Sugar’s stores today. “We are willing to pay the economic price.”

© Copyright 2013 Bloomberg News. All rights reserved.
Source: NEWSmax.com

Taiwan lawmakers approve reduced budget.


Taiwan legislature approves 2013 government budget after 2 percent cut to spending

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Taiwan’s legislature approved the 2013 government budget after cutting proposed spending by 2 percent amid an expected tax shortfall in the lackluster economy.

In the budget approved late Tuesday, total government spending will be limited to 1.9 trillion New Taiwan dollars ($65.5 billion), incurring a deficit of NT$174 billion.

Premier Sean Chen says the Cabinet will implement the required austerity measures while trying to reduce their negative impact on the economy.

Lawmakers froze the annual bonus payment of NT$290,000 for Economics Minister Shih Yen-hsiang, saying he can receive it only if the first two quarters of economic growth reach the targeted 3 percent.

Taiwan’s economy grew only 1.1 percent last year because of weak global demand for the island’s electronics exports.

Growth of 3 percent is projected for this year.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

Associated Press

Taiwan undersea oil plans raise neighbors’ eyebrows.


The island’s exploration efforts in the South China Sea could fuel tensions with China and other nations with territorial claims there. Heated rhetoric last year prompted the US to intervene.

Taiwan, a normally quiet claimant to portions of the disputed South China Sea, plans to explore for undersea oil there, a move likely to test fragile relations with China and upset major Southeast Asian nations.

Ringed by China, Vietnamthe PhilippinesIndonesia and others, the waters are believed to hold as many as 213 billion barrels of oil but competing claims from the six bordering nations have fueled tensions, prompting US officials to step in last year to urge calm.

Taiwan’s Bureau of Mines and its top energy company plan to explore this year for some of that oil near an islet that the government holds in the Spratly archipelago, a spokesman for the company said.

Taiwan’s search for oil would remind five competing nations that it still has clout, despite old foe China. The more powerful Beijing forbids its allies around Asia from talking to Taipei and has its own ambitions in the disputed 3.5 million-square-kilometer (1.4 million-square-mile) sea.

“Taiwan seems to be seeking ways to remind other nations of its sovereignty claims,” says Bonnie Glaser, senior Asia adviser with the Washington-based think tank Center for Strategic and International Studies. “Taiwan doesn’t want to be ignored or forgotten.”

Recommended: How much do you know about China? Take our quiz.

China has considered self-ruled Taiwan part of its territory since the Chinese civil war of the 1940s, chilling ties until 2008 when the two sides put aside political differences to discuss trade and economic links.

But new incidents have challenged the fragile détente, and Taiwan is already angry about last year’s Chinese passports that claim two Taiwanese landmarks. Oil could be next, as Taiwan says it has no plans to share its search with China.

Vietnam and the Philippines also staked claims in the sea. Vessels from China and the Philippines were locked in a standoff last year, and 70 Vietnamese sailors died in a clash in 1988.

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But even as both countries periodically make what’s thought of as aggressive moves in the region, both would stop short of forcing Taiwan out from the waters near Spratly where it already has an airstrip, analysts say. Too much bluster might push Taiwan closer to China, which wants more economic ties with Taiwan and which Southeast Asian claimants see as a bigger threat to their maritime interests.

“Lacking much naval power, Manila would have a hard time actually physically preventing any oil exploration by Taiwan,” says Scott Harold, associate political scientist at the RAND Corp., a policy research nonprofit in the United States.

Hanoi would have a better prospect of reacting militarily, but any stand-off would potentially put them on the wrong side of both Washington and Beijing,” he says.

But much of the oil is already spoken for. China’s state-owned CNOOC Ltd. began drilling undersea last year, and its peer in Hanoi, PetroVietnam, has started surveying. The Philippines is also contracting out other exploration tracts.

Fellow claimant Malaysia currently produces about half the South China Sea’s oil, which is estimated at 1.3 million barrels per day. Brunei also claims parts of the ocean.

Taiwan’s Bureau of Mines will draw up a budget this year and hire CPC Corp. Taiwan to look for oil, CPC spokesman Chen Ming-hui says. Officials told parliament that exploration would cost at least $562,000.

Taiwan needs the oil as 99 percent of energy sources are now imported, Mr. Chen says. “The South China Sea is a place where Vietnam and others have sighted oil, so we think the opportunities there are good,” he says.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By Ralph Jennings | Christian Science Monitor

US expert says NKorea rocket launches satellite.


TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — An American space expert said North Korea has succeeded in launching a satellite into space.

Jonathan McDowell of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics said late Tuesday fromCambridge, Massachusetts, that the three-stage Unha-3 rocket launched early Wednesday morning delivered the satellite into orbit and constituted “a perfect success for North Korea.”

He said that based on his own calculations, an object identified by the U.S. space command as “39026, 2012-072A” was from the North Korean satellite.

The apparent North Korean success comes after a rocket launch failure in April that flamed out after only 90 seconds.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By PETER ENAV | Associated Press

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