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Posts tagged ‘Wen Jiabao’

Chinese Recycling Tycoon Wants to Buy New York Times.


Image: Chinese Recycling Tycoon Wants to Buy New York TimesChinese billionaire and philanthropist Chen Guangbiao jumps on the roofs of new cars which he bought in Beijing as presents to the 43 owners of Japanese cars that were damaged during nationwide anti-Japan protests.
An eccentric Chinese recycling magnate said on Tuesday he was preparing to open negotiations to buy the New York Times Co..Chen Guangbiao, a well-known philanthropist, is something of a celebrity in China. During a particularly murky bout of pollution in January, the ebullient and tireless self-promoter handed out free cans of “fresh air”.But Chen says he is perfectly serious in his bid to buy the Times, which he said he had been contemplating for more than two years. He said he expected to discuss the matter on Jan. 5, when he is due to meet a “leading shareholder” in New York.

“There’s nothing that can’t be bought for the right price,” Chen told Reuters.

It is unlikely that the Times, which has long been controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family, would sell to Chen.

A spokeswoman for the New York Times, contacted after initial Chinese media reports about Chen’s offer, said the company did not comment on rumours.

The company’s chairman, Arthur Sulzberger, Jr., said recently that the Times was not for sale.

Chen believes the Times is worth $1 billion, but said he would be willing to negotiate.

He said that because his funds were limited, he had persuaded a Hong Kong tycoon to put in $600 million while he would pay the rest. He said the tycoon was not ready to reveal his identity.

“If we act in sincerity and good faith, I believe the Times chairman will change his way of thinking,” he said.

Chen said if he was unable to buy the New York Times, he would settle for becoming a controlling stakeholder, and failing that, would simply buy a stake.

Hurun’s Rich List of China’s super-wealthy put the magnate’s wealth at about $740 million in 2012. Chen said he would not hesitate to sell off most of his assets if it enabled him to buy the Times.

Chen said his aim was not to push any political agenda, but rather his personal ideals of “peace on earth, protecting the environment and philanthropy”.

He attracted attention in August 2012 when he bought a half-page advertisement in the New York Times stating that an island chain at the centre of a dispute with Japan had belonged to China since antiquity.

“After that, I realised that the Times’ influence all over the world is incredibly vast,” he said. “Every government and embassy, all around the world, pays attention to the New York Times.”

The Times earned the ire of the Chinese government in 2012 with a report about the wealth of former Premier Wen Jiabao. The Times website has been blocked since then.

Chen said it was natural for the government to block the site because the report on Wen “contained biased and negative things that were not verified”.

“If I acquire the Times, the paper will only report the truth and must verify all information,” he said, adding that he would like every Chinese household to subscribe to the paper.

If his offer failed, Chen said he would extend offers to CNN, the Washington Post or the Wall Street Journal.

“As long as they have some influence, I’m still willing to consider buying lesser media outlets,” he said.

© 2013 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.

Source: Newsmax.com

China’s leaders move to fill top government posts.


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BEIJING (AP) — The Chinese Communist Party‘s No. 2 leader was confirmed Friday as premier, tasked with addressing a slowing economy and defusing public anger over corruption, pollution and a growing gap between rich and poor.

China‘s rubberstamp legislature appointed Li Keqiang to the premiership as a long-orchestrated leadership transition neared its end. Final touches take place Saturday with selections of vice premiers, a central bank governor and finance and other ministers, and the legislature wraps up on Sunday.

Party chief Xi Jinping was appointed Thursday to the ceremonial post of president, completing his ascension as China’s pre-eminent leader after being promoted last November to head the Communist Party and the military.

Though the outcome of the legislative session was a foregone conclusion, it’s the result of years of fractious behind-the-scenes bargaining. They hail from different factions: Li Keqiang (pronounced lee kuh chee-ahng) is a protege of the now-retired President Hu Jintao while Xi Jinping (pronounced shee jin ping) is the son of a revolutionary veteran with backing among party elders.

Xi cuts an authoritative figure with a confidence and congeniality that was lacking in his predecessor, the aloof and stiff Hu. New Premier Li, from a mid-level official’s household, has appeared to be a cautious administrator, like Hu, and has not been associated with particular policies on his rise.

Evidence of their and their patrons’ ability to forge consensus will be seen Saturday when appointments to the Cabinet and other top government posts are announced.

As China’s top economic official, Li faces politically fraught challenges in keeping growth strong and incomes rising.

China’s leaders say they want more sustainable growth based on domestic consumption and technology instead of trade and investment. They have lowered annual growth targets to emphasize the shift. But consumer spending is rising only slowly, which has forced Beijing to keep pumping money into investment to support a sluggish economic recovery.

“If the official data is to be believed, China has been moving in the wrong direction for the past decade – towards ‘more investment, less consumption,'” wrote Standard Chartered economists Stephen Green and Wei Li in a research note. “This could create problems.”

Reformers say Communist leaders have to curb state companies that dominate industries from energy to telecoms to banking, and encourage free-market competition or growth could sink to 5 percent or lower by 2015, raising the risk of job losses and unrest. That will require Li, who has shown little appetite for confrontation, to challenge politically powerful corporate bosses.

China’s leadership is consensus-oriented, so governing the country is often sluggish business because none of the leaders are politically strong enough to prevail independently.

Wu Xiangdong, chairman of a wine company in central Hunan province and one of the congress delegates who poured out of the vast, ornate Great Hall of the People after Friday’s vote, said expectations were high for Li, the new premier.

“We are very excited and look forward to the premier and the new generation of leaders to be better able to work on the economy, food safety, the environment and improving social equality,” Wu said.

The National People’s Congress endorsed Li for the post with a vote of 2,940, with three opposed and six abstaining.

In some intriguing signs of the new leadership’s direction, the congress on Friday appointed as supreme court president Zhou Qiang, a provincial party secretary with a reputation as a progressive and a former aide to a well-known legal reformer. On Thursday, another liberal-minded reformer and a close ally of Hu, Li Yuanchao, was named vice president, breaking with the practice of recent years because he is not in the party’s seven-member ruling inner sanctum.

The new government will be expected to carry out promises outlined in a policy program delivered last week, including cleaning up the country’s environment, fighting graft and improving the social safety net.

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Associated Press writer Joe McDonald contributed to this report.

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Follow Gillian Wong on Twitter at twitter.com/gillianwong

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By GILLIAN WONG | Associated Press

China’s new leadership faces myriad challenges.


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BEIJING (AP) — China named the Communist Party’s No. 2 leader,Li Keqiang, premier on Friday as a long-orchestrated leadership transition nears its end, leaving the new leaders to confront uneven economic growth, unbridled corruption and a severely befouled environment that are stirring public discontent.

The rubber-stamp legislature endorsed Li for the post, voting 2,940 in favor, with three opposed and six abstaining. A day earlier, the legislature similarly appointed Xi Jinping to the ceremonial post of president, making him China’s pre-eminent leader following his ascent last November to head the Communist Party and the military.

Though the outcome of the legislative session was a foregone conclusion, it’s the result of years of fractious behind-the-scenes bargaining. They hail from different factions: Li Keqiang (pronounced lee kuh chahng) is a protege of the now-retired President Hu Jintao while Xi Jinping (pronounced shee jin ping) is the son of a revolutionary veteran with backing among party elders.

After Li’s selection was announced, he and Xi shook hands and smiled for photographers in the Great Hall of the People. Evidence of their and their patrons’ ability to forge consensus will be seen Saturday when appointments to the Cabinet and other top government posts are announced.

The son of a revolutionary veteran, Xi cuts an authoritative figure with a confidence and congeniality that was lacking in his predecessor, the aloof and stiff Hu. New Premier Li, from a low-level officials’ household, has appeared to be a cautious administrator, like Hu, and has not been associated with particular policies on his rise.

Together, Xi and Li now steer a rising global power beset with many domestic challenges that will test their leadership. Chief among them are a sputtering economy that’s overly dominated by powerfulstate industries.

Chinese leaders want to nurture self-sustaining growth based on domestic consumption and reducing reliance on exports and investment. Consumer spending is rising, but not as fast as Beijing wants, which has forced the government to support an economic recovery with spending on public works and investment by state companies.

“If the official data is to be believed, China has been moving in the wrong direction for the past decade — towards ‘more investment, less consumption,'” wrote Standard Chartered economists Stephen Green and Wei Li in a research note. “This could create problems.”

An increasingly vocal Chinese public is expressing impatience with the government’s unfulfilled promises to curb abuses of power by local officials, better police the food supply and clean up the country’s polluted rivers, air and soil.

“What do ordinary people care about? Food safety, and smog if you are in a big city, and official corruption,” said Chinese author and social commentator Murong Xuecun, the pen name of author Hao Qun. “They just want to have a peaceful, stable and safe life. To have money and food, and live without worry of being tortured, or having their homes forcefully demolished.”

“The entire country is watching for Xi’s next step,” the writer said.

Wu Xiangdong, chairman of a wine company in central Hunan province and one of the congress delegates who poured out of the vast, ornate Great Hall of the People after Friday’s vote, said expectations also were high for Li, the new premier.

“We are very excited and look forward to the premier and the new generation of leaders to be better able to work on the economy, food safety, the environment and improving social equality,” Wu said.

Xi’s accession marks only the second orderly transfer of power in more than six decades of Communist Party rule. Underlining that transition, after the result of Thursday’s vote was announced, the 59-year-old Xi bowed to delegates and turned to his predecessor, Hu. The two shook hands and posed for photos.

Governing China is often plodding as leaders, none of them politically strong enough to prevail individually, forge consensus with their colleagues in the collective leadership.

In some intriguing signs of the new leadership’s direction, the congress on Friday appointed as supreme court president Zhou Qiang, a provincial party secretary with a reputation as a progressive and a former aide to a well-known legal reformer. On Thursday, another liberal-minded reformer and a close ally of Hu, Li Yuanchao, was named vice president, breaking with the practice of recent years because he is not in the party’s seven-member ruling inner sanctum.

Early indications of the new government’s priorities came in a policy program delivered during last week’s opening of the legislative session. It pledged to clean up the country’s environment, fight pervasive graft and official extravagance and improve welfare benefits for the poor.

The report promised to give private companies a fairer chance to compete, but did not say how Beijing would deal with big state companies controlling most of China’s industries that economists have warned need to be curbed in order to preserve future growth. Many experts fear the government will be too hamstrung by powerful interest groups, linked to state industries, to be able to make these changes. But few doubt the urgency of the reform that’s needed.

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Follow Gillian Wong on Twitter: http://twitter.com/gillianwong

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By GILLIAN WONG | Associated Press

China’s Xi appointed president, completes rise to the top.


By Sui-Lee Wee

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s parliament formally elected heir-in-waiting Xi Jinping as the country’s new president on Thursday, completing the country’s second orderly political succession since the Communist Party took power in 1949.

The largely rubber-stamp National People’s Congress chose Xi in a tightly scripted ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in central Beijing, putting the final seal of approval on a generational transition of power.

Xi was appointed party and military chief – where real power lies – in November.

The 59-year-old was also elected head of the Central Military Commission, the parallel government post to the party’s top military position which he already holds, ensuring that he has full power over the party, state and armed forces.

There was virtually no opposition among the carefully selected legislators to Xi becoming president. Xi drew just one no vote and three abstentions from the almost 3,000 delegates.

Xi bowed deeply and shook hands with his predecessor Hu Jintao upon the announcement of the result, carried live on state television. Xi and Hu exchanged a few inaudible words.

Li Yuanchao was also elected vice president, confirming an earlier Reuters story.

There were five other candidates put forth for the vice-presidential position including Wang Yang, the reformist former party chief of southern Guangdong province, and propaganda tsar Liu Yunshan. Xi had fended off a bid by influential former president Jiang Zemin to install Liu, a source with ties to the leadership said.

Vice Premier Li Keqiang is set to succeed Premier Wen Jiabao in a similarly scripted vote on Friday.

Hu, 70, relinquished the presidency after serving the maximum two five-year terms.

Hu’s accession to president a decade ago marked Communist China‘s first peaceful transition of power. Violent events such as the Cultural Revolution and the 1989 Tiananmen crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators had overshadowed previous hand-overs.

HOPES IN XI

Since taking up the much more powerful post of party chief last November, Xi has focused on fighting corruption and promoting austere practices such as banning senior military officers from holding alcohol-fuelled banquets.

Many Chinese hope Xi will bring change in a country that has risen to become the world’s second-biggest economy but is marred by deepening income inequality, corruption and environmental destruction left over from the administration of Hu and Wen.

For Yan Chengzhong, a delegate to the legislature, the most pressing task for Xi’s government is to clean up the environment.

“I come from Shanghai, where there are 6,000 dead pigs floating in the river. It speaks to how fragile the ecological environment is,” said Yan, who said he has submitted a proposal to the legislature urging for government transparency on the environment.

“At this meeting, there’ve been very strong voices concerning the condemnation of the bad environmental situation,” Yan said. “I think these kinds of voices can be accepted by the new authorities. It’s a favorable opportunity for the new leaders to do something different.”

Gong Funeng, a delegate from the southwestern province of Sichuan, said: “The most challenging problem that the government faces now is on implementing political reform and fighting corruption.”

Xi inherits a constituency that is more distrustful of government and well-versed at using the Internet to criticize their leaders.

At the same time, his administration must deal with a slowdown in economic growth, juggle the urgent task of calming a frothy housing market, defuse local government debt risks and wean China off its addiction to investment-led expansion.

Xi will also have to deal with an increasingly provocative North Korea and tensions with the United States, Japan and Southeast Asia.

The new president has used state media to craft a folksy and low-key image, often using plain language, in contrast with his predecessors who often clogged their speeches with party jargon.

But Xi’s administration has indicated that the party, which values stability above all else, continues to brook no challenge to its power.

Prominent dissident Hu Jia told Reuters police summoned him on Wednesday afternoon on a charge of “provoking quarrels and making trouble”.

Hu said he believes it could be due to him organizing visits by activists to the home of Liu Xia, the wife of jailed Nobel Laureate Liu Xiaobo, who has been under house arrest since Liu’s award.

“Or it could also that during the parliament session, I’ve published numerous critical opinions of the Communist Party,” he said.

(Additional reporting by Xiaoyi Shao and Sabrina Mao Writing by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Raju Gopalakrishnan)

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By Sui-Lee Wee | Reuters

World stocks rise as China announces budget.


  • A man checks his cell phone outside a securities firm in Tokyo, Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Stocks in Tokyo rose on hopes that the Bank of Japan, which begins a two-day meeting on Wednesday, might demonstrate a shift in monetary policy to conform to the program championed by new Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The Nikkei 225 index advanced 0.4 percent to 11,702.46. (AP Photo/Junji Kurokawa)

    View PhotoAssociated Press/Junji Kurokawa – A man checks his cell phone outside a securities firm in Tokyo, Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Stocks in Tokyo rose on hopes that the Bank of Japan, which begins a two-day meeting …more 

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BANGKOK (AP) — World stock markets rose Tuesday as investors registered approval for China‘s spending priorities announced at its annual congress.

Markets in Hong Kong and mainland China drew encouragement from a speech by outgoing Premier Wen Jiabao and presentation of the country’s budget at the opening of the annual National People’s Congress, a ceremonial legislature.

Wen promised deficit spending to meet a growth target this year of 7.5 percent that is enshrined in the ruling Communist Party’s latest five-year development plan. Wen mentioned subsidies for agriculture and energy conservation and said the country was committed to fighting corruption and improving the environment. Wen also pledged to relax the credit supply, analysts said.

“I think that is good news for the banks. Either they will increase their quota for new loans or reduce the deposit reserve ratio. So that means boosting the money supply to support economic growth,” said Francis Lun, managing director of Lyncean Holdings in Hong Kong.

Lun also said he believes China’s leaders are aiming for something higher than the 7.5 percent growth target announced at the congress.

European stocks opened higher. Britain’s FTSE 100 rose 0.7 percent to 6,389.41. Germany’s DAX advanced 1.3 percent to 7,792.15 and France’s CAC-40 added 1.2 percent to 3,755.54. Wall Street was poised to open higher, with Dow Jones industrial futures rising 0.2 percent to 14,143 and S&P 500 futures advancing 0.2 percent to 1,528.10.

Earlier in Asia, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng rose 0.1 percent to 22,560.50. The mainland’s Shanghai Composite Index gained 2.3 percent to 2,326.31. The Shenzhen Composite Index added 2.3 percent to 964.68.

Stocks in Tokyo rose on hopes that the Bank of Japan, which begins a two-day meeting on Wednesday, might demonstrate a shift in monetary policy to conform to the program championed by new Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The Nikkei 225 index advanced 0.3 percent to 11,683.45, its highest close since September 2008.

Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 gained 1.3 percent to 5,075.40 amid bargain-hunting after a sharp sell-off the day before.

Among individual stocks, Japan’s Fast Retailing jumped 5.5 percent after the company said sales at its Uniqlo casual clothing stores jumped 9.6 percent in February from a year ago, Kyodo News Agency said.

Wall Street stocks finished higher Monday as investors put aside the uncertainty over a budget battle in Washington. President Barack Obama and his political opponents have failed so far to agree on a way to roll back automatic spending cuts that took effect Friday. Those cuts slash $85 billion from the nation’s budget, which could slow down the economy.

Benchmark oil for April delivery was up 47 cents to $90.60 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract fell 56 cents to finish at $90.12 a barrel on the Nymex on Monday.

In currencies, the euro rose to $1.3060 from $1.3022 late Monday in New York. The dollar fell to 93.01 yen from 93.42 yen.

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Follow Pamela Sampson on Twitter at http://twitter.com/pamelasampson

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By PAMELA SAMPSON | Associated Press

New York Times says targeted by China hackers after Wen report.


BEIJING (Reuters) – The New York Times said on Thursday that Chinese hackers had “persistently” attacked its computers over the past four months since the paper published a story on Premier Wen Jiabao, but sensitive material related to the report was not accessed.

The New York Times said the attacks coincided with its report last October that Wen’s family had accumulated at least $2.7 billion in “hidden riches”. China said at the time the report smeared his name and had ulterior motives.

“For the last four months, Chinese hackers have persistently attacked The New York Times, infiltrating its computer systems and getting passwords for its reporters and other employees,” The Times said on Thursday.

“Security experts hired by The Times to detect and block the computer attacks gathered digital evidence that Chinese hackers, using methods that some consultants have associated with the Chinese military in the past, breached The Times’s network.”

China’s foreign ministry rejected the New York Times claims of Chinese hacking.

“Reaching such conclusions for no reason with uncertain evidence and no proof and saying that China participates in relevant online attacks is totally irresponsible,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said at a daily news briefing.

Hong reiterated China’s stance that the country “is also a victim of online attacks” and said it hopes “the relevant party can take a responsible attitude towards this issue”.

The hackers broke into the e-mail accounts of Shanghai bureau chief, David Barboza, who wrote the story on Wen’s family, and Jim Yardley, the paper’s South Asia bureau chief in India who was previously the Beijing bureau chief, it added.

“Computer security experts found no evidence that sensitive e-mails or files from the reporting of our articles about the Wen family were accessed, downloaded or copied,” said Jill Abramson, the paper’s executive editor.

Security experts found evidence that the hackers stole the corporate passwords for every Times employee and used those to gain access to the personal computers of 53 employees, most of them outside The Times’s newsroom, the paper said.

“Experts found no evidence that the intruders used the passwords to seek information that was not related to the reporting on the Wen family.”

Computer security experts at Mandiant, the company hired by the newspaper, said the hackers tried to “cloak” the source of their attacks “by first penetrating computers at United States universities and routing the attacks through them”.

“This matches the subterfuge used in many other attacks that Mandiant has tracked to China.”

The Chinese government has repeatedly said it opposes hacking and that China too suffers frequently from these kinds of attacks.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Jeremy Laurence and Michael Perry)

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

Reuters

Eleven children killed in latest Chinese bus crash.


BEIJING (Reuters) – At least 11 Chinese kindergarten children died when their minivan plunged into a pond on Monday, the official Xinhua news agency reported.

Police detained the driver of the van, which was carrying 15 children in a rural part of the southern province of Jiangxi.

The deaths of 18 nursery school children in a bus crash in November last year caused a wave of public anger and prompted Premier Wen Jiabao to pledge more money for school bus services.

Despite the pledge, there have been a string of similar accidents. Transport is notoriously dangerous in rural China, where buses and trucks are old and badly maintained.

With more schools abandoning villages for towns, children increasingly have to travel long distances to school, or board away from their families.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

Reuters

China’s House Churches Continue Growing in Face of Persecution.


China house church
China house churches, like this one, are opposed by the official Chinese government

When Xi Jinping and Li Keqiang officially take over as the president and the premier of China in March next year, will anything change for that country’s millions of Christians who are part of the house church movement? This question, which many are asking, must not overlook China’s political system.

While the names of the new leaders were officially announced this month, the succession actually began five years ago when Xi and Li were anointed as Hu Jintao‘s and Wen Jiabao‘s successors respectively. They were groomed all these years to become the top leaders of the world’s second-most-powerful country.

There is little room for anything significant to happen suddenly in China’s politics. What is expected most from a new leadership is to maintain the continuity, while all major policy changes—with long-term planning—are made by consensus. Therefore, no individual has the power to take a major decision.

As far as religious freedom is concerned, Chinese government’s attitude toward an “unchecked” growth of the house church movement is likely to remain unchanged in the coming years. The movement comprises “unofficial” churches that operate outside of the government-controlled confederations like the Three-Self Patriotic Movement and the China Christian Council.

This explains why the Shouwang Church—which began as a home Bible study in 1993 and rose to become one of the largest house churches in 2007—is being persecuted by authorities. The church owns a floor in the Daheng Science and Technology Tower in northwest Beijing’s Zhongguancun area, but authorities have prevented the church from using the property. The church has been meeting in a park for more than a year, despite sporadic arrest and detention of its members during services.

Earlier this month, seven Christians from a house church in Henan Province were charged with engaging in activities of “Shouters,” a cult group that was founded in the 1960s in the United States and was banned by the Chinese government in the 1980s, according to the U.S.-based China Aid.

Catholics who leave the Catholic Patriotic Association (CPA)—the body created by the communist authorities—also face persecution. For example, Bishop Thaddeus Ma Daqin has been under house arrest in his seminary on the outskirts of Shanghai since July 7, according to Vatican Insider.

Authorities oppose even official churches if they seek to resist moves of the government. For instance, Chengjiao Street Three-Self Church in the northeastern city of Yushu in Jilin Province was recently denied permission to stage a public protest against the planned and allegedly illegal eviction and demolition of their church property by real estate developers, China Aid reported on Nov. 26.

Ryan Morgan, International Christian Concern‘s regional manager for Southeast Asia, said, “The only choice has been to worship illegally and face the threat of harassment, arrest, torture and imprisonment. Tens of millions of Christians in China are still forced to do this today.”

However, China’s churches appear to be strong enough to continue to grow both in numbers and spiritual depth in the face of persecution.

Source: CHARISMA NEWS.

Click here for the original article by International Christian Concern.

China Ping An attacks story on Wen family fortune.


HONG KONG (AP) — A Chinese insurance company is disputing a news report that details howPremier Wen Jiabao‘s family made a fortune from investing in the company after it lobbied Wen and others to waive rules requiring its break up.

Ping An Insurance Group said Monday that recent media coverage related to the company had “serious inaccuracies, facts being distorted and taken out of context, as well as flawed logic.”

The insurer did not name a specific news outlet nor did it say what the errors were. But the statement came a day after the New York Times published a lengthy investigation of how Wen’s relatives profited after the insurer avoided a breakup. The newspaper said the relatives’ investments were hidden behind obscure partnerships.

Ping An said it was a “law-abiding” company.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

Associated Press

Obama Hails ‘Constructive’ US-China Relationship.


PHNOM PENH, Cambodia – President Obama today said the United States and China have taken a “cooperative and constructive approach” to their relationship, as he came face-to-face with the rising economic power that his administration is trying to counter-balance in the region.

Meeting with outgoing Premier Wen Jiabao on the sidelines of the East Asia Summit, Obama reiterated his commitment to working with China, despite the tenuous relationship between the two economic superpowers.

“It’s important that our two countries cooperate to build a more secure and prosperous future for theAsia Pacific region and for the world,” he said. “As the two largest economies in the world, we have a special responsibility to lead the way in ensuring sustained and balanced growth, not only here in Asiabut globally.”

In his first post-election meeting with a Chinese leader, Obama stressed that “we work to establish clear rules of the road internationally for trade and investment, which can increase prosperity and global growth.”

Obama cast an optimistic tone at what will likely be his last meeting with Wen Jiabao. The Premier and Chinese President Hu Jintao are stepping down following China’s once in a decade leadership changes.

Obama is paying the first visit by an American president to Cambodia, a country trying to emerge from its violent and repressive past. The president arrived Monday night and went straight to what has been described as a “tense” meeting with Prime Minister Hun Sen, the 60-year-old leader who has been in power since former President Ronald Reagan was in the White House.

Obama devoted their private discussion entirely to pressing Hun Sen on human rights issues, calling for fair elections and the release of all political prisoners, according to Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes.

“[Obama] highlighted a set of issues that he was concerned about within Cambodia, in particular I would say the need for them to move towards elections that are fair and free, the need for an independent election commission associated with those elections, the need to allow for the release of political prisoners, and for opposition parties to be able to operate,” Rhodes said. “He highlighted, for instance, one case of a radio broadcaster who’s been sentenced to many years in prison simply for something that they said on the radio. He discussed the issue of land seizures, which have been a challenge for the people of Cambodia.”

“It’s necessary for us to continue to raise these issues directly with countries like Cambodia at the same time that we also foster positive examples that offer a better path so that people can see the results that come with reform,” he said.

Source: YAHOO NEWS.

By Mary Bruce | ABC OTUS News

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